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Bait Hater
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Anyone else?

I am trying to get some new glass for my Sony A6000. I am fairly new to the whole photography game but would like to upgrade from my kit lens. Current lenses are 16-50 kit lens and 55-210 kit lens. I like the sharpness of the 55-210 but sometimes the focal length can be too close. The 16-50 leaves a lot to be desired.

Looking specifically at the Sigma 16mm 1.4 and Sigma 30mm 1.4. Thoughts between the two?

Thanks,
T
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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Personally, I would look at a zoom for your everyday lens. Especially on a small boat, where you have limited room to move around in relation to your subject.

I have the Sigma 30mm f/1.4. I like it a lot for people and pets on a crop body camera (which your a6000 is), but I rarely take it on the water. It's a little tight for shooting fish and people pics on the skiff.

For a first upgrade from kit lenses, I'd be looking at a good quality f/2.8 standard zoom, like the 17-50mm Sigma. That's the equivalent of around 27-80mm full-frame. In other words, very similar to the 24-70mm f/2.8 lenses that are kind of the foundation of a good lens selection for a full-frame camera.

You don't really need anything faster than f/2.8 for 99% of outdoor shooting, so I wouldn't be worrying about f/1.4 and 1.8 lenses.

Image stabilization, on the other hand, is a big deal in my experience. I find I'm frequently shooting right on the edge of being able to hold the camera still at dawn and dusk, and image stabilization makes a real difference there.

I used to use the Sigma 10-20mm zoom a ton on crop body cameras. It's great for fish pics and other stuff actually on the boat. But its uses are pretty limited just because it's so wide.

If I could have any three lens types I wanted, it would be an f/4 or faster wide zoom (10-20mm crop or 16-35mm full frame), an f/2.8 standard zoom (17-50mm crop or 24-70 full frame), and an f/2.8 70-200mm, all with image stabilization. If I could add more specialized lenses, I'd start with a longer telephoto, like a 300mm or a 100-400mm, and then a good prime portrait lens like 50mm or 85mm f/1.2 or 1.4.
 

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I picked up a Sony A7II early last year. I bought a Samyang 85mm f1.4 and ran that setup pretty much all year on everything but landscape stuff. Its a fun lens and I learned alot about manual focus, however 85mm is way to tight for an everyday boat/fishing lens.

I also picked up a sony 28mm f2 that I have been running on my a6000. This year I am going to put the 28 on the A7II and make an effort to leave it there. I plan on running a 50 or 60 on the a6000 and that should cover anything I need to do on the water.
 

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I shoot a D750 FF with a tamron 24-70mm 2.8 for most of my on skiff pictures. Sharp, fast and its a good range on a full frame for the skiff/landscape. I also mix in my 14mm 2.8 prime a lot for fish shots and it's awesome! Something like a 16-35mm would be a great lens imo.
 

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Personally, I would look at a zoom for your everyday lens. Especially on a small boat, where you have limited room to move around in relation to your subject.

I have the Sigma 30mm f/1.4. I like it a lot for people and pets on a crop body camera (which your a6000 is), but I rarely take it on the water. It's a little tight for shooting fish and people pics on the skiff.

For a first upgrade from kit lenses, I'd be looking at a good quality f/2.8 standard zoom, like the 17-50mm Sigma. That's the equivalent of around 27-80mm full-frame. In other words, very similar to the 24-70mm f/2.8 lenses that are kind of the foundation of a good lens selection for a full-frame camera.

You don't really need anything faster than f/2.8 for 99% of outdoor shooting, so I wouldn't be worrying about f/1.4 and 1.8 lenses.

Image stabilization, on the other hand, is a big deal in my experience. I find I'm frequently shooting right on the edge of being able to hold the camera still at dawn and dusk, and image stabilization makes a real difference there.

I used to use the Sigma 10-20mm zoom a ton on crop body cameras. It's great for fish pics and other stuff actually on the boat. But its uses are pretty limited just because it's so wide.

If I could have any three lens types I wanted, it would be an f/4 or faster wide zoom (10-20mm crop or 16-35mm full frame), an f/2.8 standard zoom (17-50mm crop or 24-70 full frame), and an f/2.8 70-200mm, all with image stabilization. If I could add more specialized lenses, I'd start with a longer telephoto, like a 300mm or a 100-400mm, and then a good prime portrait lens like 50mm or 85mm f/1.2 or 1.4.
Dang just sold my Canon 100-400 lens and 2.4 Magnifier,sorry.
 
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