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I've wanted a DSLR to take on the skiff for years...nature photography and etc. But noone else in the house felt the need so it was an uphill battle rationalizing the expense.

BUT...my wife now wants one for our Canadian Rockies trip this summer and my daughter has discovered a passion for photo and video production via a class she's taking in high school as a freshman.

SO...I've gotten a mandate to shop for and procure a DSLR, including telephoto lens and etc.

Thoughts from you guys who frequently take your cameras out on your skiffs?

Preferred camera bodies, lenses, cases, etc?
 

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WoW a LOT has changed !

I Vote for a NIKON you can get a D3300 from KEH of refurbished from Nikon and save big bux ...Good long telephotos are BIG $$$

Lots of people are looking at the Sony 6000 series but I have no dog in that fight ...Just Sayin ...
 

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Body honestly doesn't matter that much. They're all fine with minor differences in features. Once you go down the Canon or Nikon road (or Sony or whatever) you're kind of stuck with that choice though.

The only really big difference in bodies is crop sensor (APS-C) vs. full-frame sensor. Full-frame provides noticeably better dynamic range (ability to show details in deeper shadows and brighter highlights). But it's expensive too. The cheapest Canon full-frame is the 6D at $1,500 MSRP for just the body. That's what I shoot. Nikon has a D610 and D750 for similar prices.

The lens(es) matter a lot more than the body. Choices depend on what you'll mainly be using it for. But don't get the crappy kit lens. Better to buy a cheaper body and put the savings into a better lens.
 

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Better to buy a cheaper body and put the savings into a better lens.
Yup. Makes sense. Just gotta settle on the right body to start with.
 

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I just bought a Sony A7. Full frame, mirrorless. Sure, the A7 has been out for several years, but for someone like me, I'll never notice. You can get the body for less than $800 every day.

Btw, there are lens adapters to go from nearly any mirrorless body to any vintage lens, no matter the make. I'm still researching this option, but there's some good vintage glass out there for a fraction of the cost of new lenses. Something to consider.
 
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I LOVE and use all my old ashi glass from the 70's
 
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I can't add much to what zthomas said. I have a Canon EOS 7D that I bought in 2010 and it's been flawless but I can't say it gets enough use. I have absolutely no complaints about it. I have made an effort to take it on the boat more and even though it's a 2010 camera with the kit lens, it still takes better photos than my new iphone X so don't let anyone tell you a phone will work just as well.

The L series lens make all the difference but damn they are expensive.

I started to buy a Pelican case for mine on the boat but my soft case has an internal suspension system and seems to hang from my leaning post really well. Between that and the 7D's "sealed" camera body I've had no issues. The 7D II is suppposed to have significantly better sealing than the 7D.
 
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A few things to keep in mind;

First, expensive cameras won't make you a better photographer. Ansel Adams took some of the most iconic photos in history with a camera he bought at a yard sale.

Second, learning HOW to use the camera, lenses and filters will make a huge difference in your photos.

Third, I recommend checking out Ken Rockwell's site at https://www.kenrockwell.com/. Ken is a seasoned professional photographer who knows more about the good and bad of cameras and lenses than most of us will ever know. He also has lists of the best glass (lenses) and many of those are older lenses you can buy on eBay.

Last, find a fishing photographer who's work you admire and learn how to create similar images. Some really good photographers are Jim Klug from Yellow Dog Flyfishing and Bryan Gregson.
 
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