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Discussion Starter #1
The in-laws are building a dock and we’re wanting to put some underwater lights under it. Anybody have any recommendations on brands? Willing to pay for something that’s not going to need replacing every year.

thanks for any input
 

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I’ll let others that have docks recommend lights. From years and years of fishing dock lights here’s what I look for... I want lights in or over at least four feet of water (deeper is better) and hopefully where there’s some current as the tide moves in and out. Next, those lights need to be in place and on every night with the same hours before they’re active and holding fish each night. Lastly the longer they’re in place - the better they fish...

Now for the tough part. It takes a bit of determination to set up and maintain dock lights so my hat’s off to anyone who keeps a good light working

We try to treat a good light like it was gold. These days they’re few and far between down here in Biscayne Bay...
 

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Illumisea is a decent brand. If they don't want it broken and snagged all the time, try to place it back under their dock a bit. Not as good for us dock light fisherman but the heavy gear throwers won't break it as often. That seems to be the worst issue. Someone breaking it on you and they are not cheap. I throw flies so I haven't broken any but talking to homeowners, it happens more than they like.

Larry said it well: To fish well it needs to be on all the time, in current and have a bit of depth.
 

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One thing that I have noticed from the fishing perspective and I would be interested if others agree. There are varying degrees of color between types of lights. The 2 that I see most in the Tampa Bay area have a very green glow and a yellow green glow. My observation is that when placed in equally attractive locations the yellow green lights attract far more life. I don't have any expertise in lighting and do not know what causes the difference but I see it all the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Awesome, thanks for the input fellas. That’s good info about having people snag it...will have to put some thought into that during installation. This will be in an area that doesn’t get a ton of travel at night, so hopefully doesn’t get fished a ton.

any other viewers with other opinions/recommendations are still appreciated while I look into the already suggested brand!
 

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I have the green blob fishing light, plug it in, then toss the light in the water. Although there are WAY better models. I’m a renter, wasn’t going to spend $1k on a light. Went through a couple of these already but the manufacturer is decent people and replaced them under warranty.

I’ve been able to get an insane amount of time in on the light, I once wiped the light down for cleaning and tossed it back in, it was in maybe 12-15” more shallow water, I DID NOT see a snook or tarpon again until I moved it back to deeper water. I got super lucky with my canal though, snook and tarpon more than 75% of the year.
 

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It's weird how some lights just attract fish and others just don't. Some you think would be perfect due to location, depth, and current flow and they just plug with catfish. Never been totally been able to figure it out and I dock light fish daily. As Capt Lemay, said, having them on day in / day out is one of key factors.
 

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Doesn't even have to be all night long... some of the lights we fish shut down automatically at midnight or 1Am - but they do need to be on every night so the fish come to expect that they've got a reliable feeding spot... New lights rarely show any fish at all - but a few months of a nightly routine and you're golden...

Years ago all the docklights we fished were above the water (and you looked for that magic "green circle"... Nowadays most lights are submerged - the best are out in front of the dock and have no obstructions (pilings, lines , floats) between you and the light.
 

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The yellow/green lights are always my favorite. It seems the more yellow the better the light is. Here in Lauderdale the dimmer the light the better chance it holds Tarpon, but brighter lights hold more Snook. I don't know if there's a reason or if my brain is playing tricks on me and its all by chance. It also changes from season to season as well.
 

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Here is where I got my lights. I got the pair. And @lemaymiami is right. They have to be on every night. Also, the big fish are not on the light, they are out in the darkness around the light. It is the little fish that trouts and reds that run right through the light. And it is the little trouts that make the big smash on the surface. One summer, we had a big bull red that took up residence every night around my lights and chased off any other smaller reds that came around. I had no idea they were territorial.
Underwater Dock & Fish Lights to Attract Fish Anywhere!
 

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We have had dock lights for over 25 years and just about every brand you can image. Here is my advice after dealing with everything imaginable on them. Is everything I type below true 100% of the time, of course not but 25 years of experience has led me to these conclusions and decisions.

1. Dont get underwater lights. Get above water lights and mount them on the pilings. Underwater lights over time attract trash fish, bait fish, and do not provide a visual buffer between you and the fish.
2. Get LED lights and post them up on the piling that have an adjustable hinge so you can position them to shoot out over the water they are not affixed at the angle in the position they are mounted. Our tides are only like 1' so the pier is about 2-3' above the water level and the lights are 2' above the pier on the dock so they are about 4'-5' feet off the water. The fish are less spooky to me because they look up and see a big light and not you so it allows you more movement on the dock without scaring the fish (if you are fly fishing or walking around).
3. Put the junction box on the piling right below the light and run the wires via conduit under the dock and up the pole. This will save you from when storms or big boat wakes wake the dock and avoid getting water in the junction boxes which short out the lights.
4. Get at least 50W lights. I dont find color makes a huge issue. We have had yellow, white, and sort of greenish hue. The yellow seem to attract more bugs.
5. Put them on a photo cell so they come on when it gets dark and goes off when its not dark. I dont like timers. Who knows when you want to fish and I dont think it is best for the dock to turn lights on and off.
6. They need to be on every night.
7. Put some on the front, and some on the side. For some reason if you end up having 1 or 2 lights if the trash fish take over, its hard to get rid of them. We have some lights that mangrove snapper like and some lights that redfish like and some lights that trout like. I have no idea why.


I probably forgot something but that is where I would start.
 

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I have the green blob fishing light, plug it in, then toss the light in the water. Although there are WAY better models. I’m a renter, wasn’t going to spend $1k on a light. Went through a couple of these already but the manufacturer is decent people and replaced them under warranty.

I’ve been able to get an insane amount of time in on the light, I once wiped the light down for cleaning and tossed it back in, it was in maybe 12-15” more shallow water, I DID NOT see a snook or tarpon again until I moved it back to deeper water. I got super lucky with my canal though, snook and tarpon more than 75% of the year.
I agree. I live in a mostly fresh an sometimes brackish freshwater canal. I don't "own" the easement adjoining my house so I needed something easily removable if some one makes an issue of it. I own this light and find it very good looking in the water and had an issue which was immediately replaced under warrenty. I wipe it down once a month with a clorox wipe and send it back into the brine. It works great. I am not sure if its a fish catching machine in the fresh but it looks super cool in the water at a great price point.
 

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Here is where I got my lights. I got the pair. And @lemaymiami is right. They have to be on every night. Also, the big fish are not on the light, they are out in the darkness around the light. It is the little fish that trouts and reds that run right through the light. And it is the little trouts that make the big smash on the surface. One summer, we had a big bull red that took up residence every night around my lights and chased off any other smaller reds that came around. I had no idea they were territorial.
Underwater Dock & Fish Lights to Attract Fish Anywhere!
I also have had very good luck w/ Underwater Fish Lights. Mine is on every night.
 

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Fish spook too easy around underwater lights no matter what state you live in. Nothing beats a warm white spot shining down into the water from about 10-12’ up.
 

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For under water lights, I recommend Deep Glow lights. They are super simple for use. You just throw them in, they sink light up, and sit directly on the bottom. Just pull the cord to get the light out of the water to clean and reset. From personal experience, I'd shy away from the brands that have bulbs elevated off the bottom because they can be easily snagged. I agree that over head lights may fish better, but nothing beats the looks of an underwater light.
 

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For under water lights, I recommend Deep Glow lights. They are super simple for use. You just throw them in, they sink light up, and sit directly on the bottom. Just pull the cord to get the light out of the water to clean and reset. From personal experience, I'd shy away from the brands that have bulbs elevated off the bottom because they can be easily snagged. I agree that over head lights may fish better, but nothing beats the looks of an underwater light.
Never seen that brand - looks like a good product. Lot of stuff they are doing makes great sense for durability and not getting destroyed by us docklight fishing guys.
 
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