Do I need a mechanic or a priest?

Discussion in 'Outboard Maintenance' started by SomaliPirate, Mar 6, 2018.

  1. Boatbrains

    Boatbrains Well-Known Member

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    I am sorry I offended you man. Was seriously trying not to. Just remember that the service team is there to keep that engine goin for the tournament. They then take that back to the engineers and work on the problem as a whole. These manufacturers can’t be telling average Joe he has to tilt his motor up and down after starting and stopping repeatedly or after a lot of idleing. The public will not accept this. I’m not calling you a liar because I have seen those guys drill holes in cowlings and midsections to bandaid a motor for a tournament before. But believe me they are recording everything they do for the engineers also. Thank you for helping the OP and anyone else that needs it though.
     
  2. kylet

    kylet Active Member

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    It wasn’t at a tournament. He’s a friend and we were fishing and filming. I can assure you he doesn’t take any engine to engineers. You’re still passively trying to discredit me. Dude, just don’t believe it and move on. If I was going off of info that I haven’t experienced then I would have told op that I had heard instead of experienced numerous times.
     

  3. Boatbrains

    Boatbrains Well-Known Member

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    Ok, now for starters I wasn’t attempting to discredit you or what you said! You got all butt hurt because I said the op fixed his problem! Nothing passive about me! I call it like I see it have my whole life. I did not say that your method would not work, I did say that it is not a viable solution for the problem! “ the market won’t allow it” Now here is a thought, OP said he found a bad/corroded terminal, this will cause heat build up each time he tries to crank it, after a few times this heat becomes excessive, now we have severe voltage drop, now we get boat loaded and drive home, cable has time to cool down, engine starts fine. The OP seems to have a little knowledge and was able to track down the problem. Now, if you want to have that beer one day... I’ll buy it! Heck, I’ll buy everyone on this forum a round if you can “flood” an engine the way you described that I can’t start without tilting all the way up then back down! Now you just made me sound like an arrogant a$$ “which anyone that knows me will tell you I am not” THANKS and best of luck to ya.
     
  4. kylet

    kylet Active Member

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    K
     
  5. Boatbrains

    Boatbrains Well-Known Member

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    And now that ya got me goin, if you read the original post... the motor was in the tilted up posistion for a while prior to him experiencing his problem!
     
  6. Boatbrains

    Boatbrains Well-Known Member

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    Now sir, I must apologize. You were truly offering sound advise. I can see how your method would work in the field to get one going. And I do hope to have that beer with you someday! I’ll buy.
     
    kylet likes this.
  7. yobata

    yobata I Love microskiff.com!

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  8. Jim Lenfest

    Jim Lenfest Well-Known Member

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    The following post is for the person in the future, that reads all of this because he has a similar problem but still can not find it. I personally, on at least 2 occasions have had a starter that worked cold, but would bind up and crank slow as it got warm. Once was on a car, an old slant 6 Dodge, and once on a Mercury outboard. I always presumed that it was due to metals expanding in the bearing area as it warmed. But due to a comment in this thread, I am thinking maybe a hot wire within the starter as opposed to outside the starter may be a culprit as well. In any event, starters turn very freely, therefore, if things are turning slow, try turning it with your fingers or a screwdriver, just to see if it may be tightening up. In the case of the Slant 6, it was an elderly friend and he was away from home in an Ames parking lot. We ran in and grabbed a $3 set of sockets, some emery paper, maybe a couple of screwdrivers. I removed his starter, as suspected, the shaft end was all roughed up. I sanded it for 5-10 minutes, reassembled the starter, and she fired right up. I told him he better get a new starter asap. He did the opposite and probably got another year out of the starter before he had to break down and get a new one.
     
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  9. Jim Lenfest

    Jim Lenfest Well-Known Member

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    Another similar starter failure: Once I stopped into the local garage, I was probably 16 and in High School. Ralph the mechanic, who knew me well, asked me to watch inside the starter area of a VW van as he hit the key. He was wondering if maybe the solenoid was not working and wanted me to listen for the telltale click. As I watched, I heard the click, but also noticed that the heavy wire to the starter was literally expanding and drooping and would contract again when he released the key. It was obviously drawing a lot of current to cause this. I said, "Ralph, the starter is froze up, and explained what I saw", as to why I had come to that conclusion. He and the owner argued that it was fine just yesterday. I said, "well, it is seized up right now". Ralph then looked at the owner and said, "He bags groceries at the IGA store". I said, ok, and walked down the hill to work bagging groceries at that IGA. That evening Ralph and his wife walked in to do their grocery shopping and I asked, "What was wrong with the VW?" He replied, "Seized Starter".

    As Nationwide says, "Life comes at you quickly". I say, just because it worked ten minutes ago, does not mean it is not broke now.
     
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