Do I need a mechanic or a priest?

Discussion in 'Outboard Maintenance' started by SomaliPirate, Mar 6, 2018.

  1. SomaliPirate

    SomaliPirate Well-Known Member

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    So here's where I am: I had two different places test my battery and it's supposedly good. I put it back in the skiff and hooked everything up. With everything off, the battery showed 12.76 volts on my multimeter. I cranked it up just fine and at idle, the meter showed 15.10 volts. Seems to be charging, right? I revved it up a little to around 1500rpm and the meter showed 14.5 volts. Drop it back to idle and it shows 15.10 again. Isn't it supposed to charge less at idle? I'm thinking now it may be, as Vertigo said, a rectifier issue. I called around to price one and holy hell they are a lot more expensive than the ones on the old OMC crap I used to run.
     
    flysalt060 likes this.
  2. FlyBy

    FlyBy I Love microskiff.com!

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    Yeah, maybe, if you want to convert to Buddhism.
     

  3. SomaliPirate

    SomaliPirate Well-Known Member

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    Update: After further searching, I found a corroded spot in the positive battery cable. I replaced it and it's good to go. Ran like a scalded dog yesterday and I even got her slimed up a little. Thanks for all the input y'all!
     
  4. makin moves

    makin moves Well-Known Member

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    I would still bless it with the holy water.
     
  5. SomaliPirate

    SomaliPirate Well-Known Member

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    I spilled some of my bourbon and coke on the deck while I was washing it on sunday and said some holy words so I think that counts, right?
     
  6. makin moves

    makin moves Well-Known Member

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    With out a doubt!
     
  7. Jim Lenfest

    Jim Lenfest Well-Known Member

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    Generally speaking, in my experience, the more cylinders the easier to start. I figure it is because the displacement is spread out over time, not all cylinders compress at once. Now if you have ever had the opportunity to pull over a large single cylinder snowmobile engine, you will know exactly what I mean and why Honda puts compression releases on their single cylinder ATV's. Especially on a kick back and a pull cord is ripped from your cold hands at 100mph or at least it seams that way.
     
  8. Jim Lenfest

    Jim Lenfest Well-Known Member

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    Great, as I was leaning toward that rectifier too. But I also always say, make sure all connections are good. Cleaning a ground wire on my older GMC pickup, once fixed a major transmission problem. Remember, they are all electronically controlled now. No ground and they won't work right. Same with everything these days.
     
    SomaliPirate likes this.
  9. permitchaser

    permitchaser I Love Skinny Water

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    Ah, my 140 doesn't have a pull cord not do I want to try it. I'm going to put a charger on my battery tomorrow
     
  10. Jim Lenfest

    Jim Lenfest Well-Known Member

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    Does it have a cut out in the flywheel to wrap a pull cord around? If it is a 6 cylinder or even a 4, I bet it could be pulled over.
     
  11. kylet

    kylet Active Member

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    I know this is old but I just saw this. Every 2s yamaha I've owned has done this. The fix (and I know you're going to think I'm screwing with you) trim the engine all the way up as high as it will tilt then trim it all the way back down and turn the key. What's happening is you are flooding the engine with repeated start/stops and mostly idling. It's a good idea once it does this and you get it started to make a little run and get the rpms up. I'm not a mechanic, but I have seen it over and over again.

    That's why when you got home it fired up with no problem and the battery read fine.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2018 at 4:35 PM
    SomaliPirate and NativeBone like this.
  12. Jim Lenfest

    Jim Lenfest Well-Known Member

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    makes sense, the trimming up and down, dumps the carbs so that you dry up the gas in the cylinders before new gas arrives. I have done a similar thing, by disconnecting the gas line at the engine, cranking till I know all gas has been used or passed through the engine, then I reconnect the hose and try starting the engine again.
     
  13. Smackdaddy53

    Smackdaddy53 Zephyr Cove is on FIRE!

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    My 70TLRZ never has any issues, is this only on larger Yamahas?
     
  14. Boatbrains

    Boatbrains Well-Known Member

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    Somali’s problem was a bad cable. Idleing around a lot can cause a carbed motor to load up though. Usually opening the throttle up a bit will burn off this excess fuel. Never had to trim one out and back down to get it to run, anyone having to do this is either mixing too rich or carbs need adjusted because the idle fuel/air mixture is too rich. Just my opinion.
     
  15. kylet

    kylet Active Member

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    If you want to experience it, spend a day starting and stopping with mostly idle operation. I can make it never happen as well, because more often than not you don't operate a boat like that. I learned about it from a member of Yamaha's service team that travels and supports tournament trails. It's not exclusive to carbureted engines either. You can take it for what its worth. It don't really matter to me, but I'd bet a paycheck that his engine would have turned over had he done like like it did when he got home.
     
  16. kylet

    kylet Active Member

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    no, it's not only on larger yamahas. Just guessing though, I would imagine it would be more likely for it to happen on a larger engine. Ive seen it happen on 70's and 90's.
     
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  17. Boatbrains

    Boatbrains Well-Known Member

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    I wasn’t trying to argue, was simply stating that the OP found and solved his problem. I never say never, but can tell you that in 20 plus years as a factory certified Yamaha, Mercury, BRP, Suzuki tech. that I have never had an engine not turn over due to the flooded scenario you described. Now, If an engine is hydrolocked then it will turn over hard or not at all. That is a different problem all together though and if said motor is hydrolocking then it needs help. Tilting and draining the fuel might work but a bigger issue is the culprit.
     
  18. kylet

    kylet Active Member

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    he got it home and cranked with no issues the same day as the problem. a corroded spot on the cable did not cause what was described in the op. if it was a cable issue he would have got nothing. not a slow turnover or a lagging turnover. it would have also shut his engine down if he was ever running and lost enough voltage to not start the engine. i'm sure the cable probably had corrosion like 90% of marine battery cables do, but his problem was solved weeks before he found the corrosion on the cable. he could have added a yeti sticker and that would have done the trick...
     
  19. Boatbrains

    Boatbrains Well-Known Member

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    Ok, your the man! You got it figured out. Way to go!
     
  20. kylet

    kylet Active Member

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    Dude, you came in here basically saying what I have seen several times over and over can’t happen. I don’t need confirmation or applause. Just trying to help the guy out. I’m not post my merit. I understand you have 20 plus years as a mechanic on every outboard available. I also understand as you probably do as well that you would never see this issue in a shop. No engine diagnostics are going to show this. I don’t care either way if you believe me or not, but I’m going to respond to someone discrediting what I’ve seen regularly just because they claim they’ve never heard of it. If that bothers you then I’m sorry. Maybe we can meet, I’ll by you a beer and flood your engine sometime.