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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm making a new bulkhead hatch to access my gas tank and to put in a new one. Even though I'm making the hatch as big as possible the old gas tank will still be a few inches too big. So what would be my safest options to cut it out?
 

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Brandon, FL
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Are you saying they built the deck over the tank?

It should fit out the hatch.

But nonetheless less, after you open the bulkhead can you cut it in half with a hand saw?
 

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If you use anything powered, make sure the tank is empty and completely purged out, otherwise we could be hearing about you on the news.
If you decide not to purge it and use an air tool, attach a ground wire to it. Static can and will ignite fuel residue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Are you saying they built the deck over the tank?

It should fit out the hatch.

But nonetheless less, after you open the bulkhead can you cut it in half with a hand saw?
Yeah, the tank was built in the boat and to remove the cap I would have to do a whole lot more cutting than making a new bulk head hatch. It has a front hatch on the deck but it's to small and another bulkhead in front of the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you use anything powered, make sure the tank is empty and completely purged out, otherwise we could be hearing about you on the news.
If you decide not to purge it and use an air tool, attach a ground wire to it. Static can and will ignite fuel residue.
A ground wire to the tank?
 

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From the tool to the tank. It will equalize static between the two pieces.
I still recommend emptying the tank and either air or liquid purging of the tank.

I spent 21 years of my life working in and on aircraft fuel systems.
Gasoline is way more volatile than jet fuel.

Drain the tank, and wash it out with soap and water before you cut into it and you'll have no issues.
 

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Quite a few boats either require some cutting to remove a fuel tank - or the complete un-bolting of the deck cap so that you can raise it enough to remove an old fuel tank (another of those "ask me how I know" moments). My old Maverick skiff (and maybe every other Maverick - along with all the Hewes skiffs...) are in the "raise the deck" category (and that requires that you first remove the rubrail...)... Me, I'd strongly consider selling my old skiff if I ever had to do that again since it's a definite PITA...

As far as tanks around power tools... simply drain the tank then fill it with soapy water - before working around it with anything that might spark... Once the tank is removed you'll want it cleaned thoroughly anyway (some even steam clean tanks to get them ready to go back into service...). Flush thoroughly with freshwater afterwards - then allow to dry in the sun... Occasionally tanks will get a very small hole - but still be structurally sound and worth repairing and that's what you'll have to do before doing any welding, etc...

By the way a skilled glass shop can cut into deck or bulkhead, remove and replace a tank (mostly you'll want a new tank with rare exceptions..) and not leave one sign that the work was done... Of course you'll be bringing your wallet or credit card - and it won't be cheap...

Aren't boats fun?
 
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