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Any recommendations for an 8 wt cold water intermediate line? I'll use it for striper fishing here in Georgia during the cooler months.
 

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I just went through this. The airflo ridged striper line (a long-headed, true to weight, ridged line) gets a lot of accolades over on SOL from guys who fish 'em. I bought one but it took all season for it to finally arrive and thus I don't have any first hand experience with it yet. I'm not a fan of ridged lines but most of the time I use a two handed retrieve hence line cuts are not a big worry.
 

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I'm a big fan of Wulff's Triangle Taper Saltwater Intermediate (teal colored line). That's what I use up here (NJ) for cold water. I have it in both 8 and 9 weights and it casts well for me. Low memory even coldwater. It was definitely an upgrade from the rio clear intermediate I used before on my 8wt.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm a big fan of Wulff's Triangle Taper Saltwater Intermediate (teal colored line). That's what I use up here (NJ) for cold water. I have it in both 8 and 9 weights and it casts well for me. Low memory even coldwater. It was definitely an upgrade from the rio clear intermediate I used before on my 8wt.
Thanks - the comparison to RIO is helpful, I have that one in tropical, thought about the coldwater version but wanted some opinions.
 

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I have had bad luck with Rio's. Have been very happy with various weight SA Titan Sonar intermediate.10 thru 12 wt though. Havent casted an 8.
 

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I have a Cortland 444 full intermediate, the whole line is clear and they are a bit cheaper than others. I don't like it in the heat because it wilts but it's pretty nice in winter.
 

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Not sure if it is still made, but Cortland has a line called a Blitz that is awesome for cold water. It is an intermediate head and floating running line. It is a fantastic line that will cast a looooong ways.
 

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as many said the airflo striper cold intermediate is the best line for this.

second place would be SA sonar intermediate cold
Why exactly does everyone like this line?

I see it recommended on SOL all the time but I don’t love it. I think it’s the way it feels in my hand, not the actual performance.

Also, I think it’s around a half heavy.
 

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The first 30' of the 7wt Airflo coldwater striper line I have weighs 175grains so I don't think it is an overweighted line.

I like to carry a lot of line while casting from a boat so the long head on this line theoretically should offer a distance advantage.

I agree the texture is weird and would likely require wearing a stripping guard if stripped over a finger.

It is a polyurethane line (rather than PVC) which reportedly offers some durability advantages.

Airflo sells another "brick on a string" intermediate they call the "sniper" so it is easy to get them confused. I have this line and despise it. It is way overweighted and has a very thick head.

Again, I've not fished the coldwater striper line yet so I'm not recommending it, just passing on what I know about it.
 

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I think their website must be off then.

They list the 7 wt at 260 for the whole head. If you divide 260 by 40' you get 6.5 gr/ft. Multiply that by 30' and you get 195. Obviously there is the front and back taper, but if take that into account I think it would actually increase weight of the first 30'.

For a long time I've wanted to compile line data. By having people send in old lines I could chop them up by 5 ft increments, weight them and post the data online. To have a searchable database of this info would be gold.

I use that line for practice casting over the fall/winter/spring. That could be why I don't like the line. Practicing with the Ridge in 35 degree weather will never feel as nice as throwing a smooth floating line on an 80 degree day. Apples to oranges.
 

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The front taper is 8 ft.
I've weighed it twice and the line I have is 175grains for the 1st 30'.
The total head is 263grains.
Someone over on SOL ruined the guides on his brand new Exocett lawn casting with a ridged line

Your point is well taken. Since a WF line is meant to be cast with the entire head through the guides before delivery it is the entire head weight, not the first 30', that really determines whether or not the line matches the rod well.
 

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The front taper is 8 ft.
I've weighed it twice and the line I have is 175grains for the 1st 30'.
The total head is 263grains.
Someone over on SOL ruined the guides on his brand new Exocett lawn casting with a ridged line

Your point is well taken. Since a WF line is meant to be cast with the entire head through the guides before delivery it is the entire head weight, not the first 30', that really determines whether or not the line matches the rod well.
Well, I wouldn't say I ruined all the guides on the rod. Just the tip top. And I still use it with other lines and have no issues. T&T offered to replace the tip top next time I can drive out. I think it has more to do with the baseball diamond brick/clay mix that is right next to the field where I cast.
 

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Its not really practical to weigh sections of a cut up line and get a meaningful number. You can however measure the diameter of the line and make a map of the taper. Its really about how the weight is distributed through the line that matters and diameter is a good indication of the distribution.

The rod/line match problem has come up because people broke the old system by calling a line a standard number when its really not and calling a rod a standard weight when it may cast better with a non standard line. Kinda like women’s dress sizes - given nearly identical dresses from two makers, they’ll always go for the smaller number size. That tag says she’s a size 6 and not an 8 - end of that story.

My advice on picking a line and rod is to start by picking something that fits together by the industry standard numbers. And start with a traditional WF taper and not the currently popular “shooting head” like designs. That is probably going to work well for most fishing situations. Save the wacky tapers for special uses. You’ll be surprised how often a standard line is the best all around choice.

A 225 grain 8 weight line isn’t. Its something else, non standard and for some special use. IMO, it should not be sold as an 8, because its not. But its common use is to make up for a rod that’s a bit too stiff for a normal human to cast and fish, or for lack of casting ability. The answer is to learn to cast better, not to mis-match the line and rod to fix either a lack of casting ability or using gear not suited to the task at hand.

To return to the OP, I suggest looking for a standard type taper that is a true 8 weight.
 
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