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Maverick HPXS
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for insight on how to work with epoxy in cooler temps. Currently using standard 2:1 laminating epoxy resin.

I do my work in an uninsulated stand alone garage and with temps into the 40s at night and getting lower I am worried I am going to start running into issues with curing.

I’m reluctant to run a heater unsupervised and don’t know how effective it would even be.
 

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Contact whoever made (or sold) the resins you’re working with... They will almost certainly have curing schedules for whatever temps you’re laminating in (as well as mixing formula variations that can either speed up or slow down curing rates in different conditions.
 

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Lowcountry Degen
2021 Conchfish 17.8
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2,144 Posts
Looking for insight on how to work with epoxy in cooler temps. Currently using standard 2:1 laminating epoxy resin.

I do my work in an uninsulated stand alone garage and with temps into the 40s at night and getting lower I am worried I am going to start running into issues with curing.

I’m reluctant to run a heater unsupervised and don’t know how effective it would even be.
What brand resin are you using? I'm using resin from the guys on Folly Rd (medium hardener) and it did pretty well Veterans Day weekend when it was low 40s at night -- it was 70 during the day though and 74 the day after. I don't think these temps are low enough to prevent anything from curing, it might just take longer. The biggest issue I had was that the resin gets very thick in the cold temps and is hard to pour. I also had to be careful to scrape my measuring cup really, really well to make sure I was actually using the amount that I measured.

I have one of those small radiator type oil-filled heaters that doesn't put off tons of heat, but I feel like it's pretty safe. Still, I keep it at least a few feet from anything else and I use the heaviest extension cord I can (don't use a power strip or anything). In an uninsulated garage space it will actually do a pretty good job as long as the walls aren't open (unfortunately most of mine are).
 

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Maverick HPXS
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Bryson, I’m using the same stuff from leaptech there. So far no issues just longer cure time but I am trying to plan ahead. I agree it is thick but really thins out with the hardener. I could not get the resin to flow through the pump.

I may just give a heater a go, thanks for the safety tips.
 

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Lowcountry Degen
2021 Conchfish 17.8
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2,144 Posts
Bryson, I’m using the same stuff from leaptech there. So far no issues just longer cure time but I am trying to plan ahead. I agree it is thick but really thins out with the hardener. I could not get the resin to flow through the pump.

I may just give a heater a go, thanks for the safety tips.
Yeah man no problem. I ended up storing my resin inside until I needed it, and using a work light on it to keep it a little warmer once I brought it into the garage. It really helped when using the pump (actually made it usable, ha). The pumps were too much of a hassle when doing large batches though, so I ended up pouring to measure when I was glassing my hull.
 

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Mostly Harmless
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2,257 Posts
1.) Fast, or at least medium, hardener.

2.) Keep your resin and hardener in a heated area until you need it.

3.) I ran as many electric heaters as the breaker would allow while I was present. I turned them off after my final check for the night.

4.) In addition to providing light to work by, halogen work lights heat up the surfaces you point them at, so they help the surface stay much warmer than the surrounding air. I used them instead of the heaters overnight; I felt like I needed sunglasses in my garage at night.

5.) Once the epoxy starts to kick, you are golden. Epoxy makes enough heat to fully cure under halogen lights in an unheated garage. I even used slow hardener in this manner, but medium and fast hardener were much nicer.

6.) Remember that the fumes from propane and kerosene heaters can cause blushing of epoxy in addition to killing you, so proceed with caution in enclosed areas. Fast hardener is more prone to blushing as a rule.

Nate
 

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Plays with Glass...
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3,156 Posts
Make sure it’s an electric space heater. I’m Floridian so forgive me
1.) Fast, or at least medium, hardener.

2.) Keep your resin and hardener in a heated area until you need it.

3.) I ran as many electric heaters as the breaker would allow while I was present. I turned them off after my final check for the night.

4.) In addition to providing light to work by, halogen work lights heat up the surfaces you point them at, so they help the surface stay much warmer than the surrounding air. I used them instead of the heaters overnight. I felt like I needed sunglasses in my garage at night.

5.) Once the epoxy starts to kick, you are golden. Epoxy makes enough heat to fully cure under halogen lights in an heated garage. I even used slow hardener in this manner, but medium and fast hardener were much nicer.

6.) Remember that the fumes from propane and kerosene heaters can cause blushing of epoxy in addition to killing you, so proceed with caution in enclosed areas. Fast hardener is more prone to blushing as a rule.
Nate
Number 6 is super important. Will also contaminate your workspace for future layups.
 

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Premium Member
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I have some 1 to 1 epoxy I've been using to coat plywood and the temps for the next 3 or so days are 40's at night then up to 61 during the day (coldest since last January) so plan to stick the hardener and resin jugs in some warm water to bring there temp up to mix tomorrow when coating some more wood.
 

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Maverick HPXS
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
1.) Fast, or at least medium, hardener.

2.) Keep your resin and hardener in a heated area until you need it.

3.) I ran as many electric heaters as the breaker would allow while I was present. I turned them off after my final check for the night.

4.) In addition to providing light to work by, halogen work lights heat up the surfaces you point them at, so they help the surface stay much warmer than the surrounding air. I used them instead of the heaters overnight. I felt like I needed sunglasses in my garage at night.

5.) Once the epoxy starts to kick, you are golden. Epoxy makes enough heat to fully cure under halogen lights in an heated garage. I even used slow hardener in this manner, but medium and fast hardener were much nicer.

6.) Remember that the fumes from propane and kerosene heaters can cause blushing of epoxy in addition to killing you, so proceed with caution in enclosed areas. Fast hardener is more prone to blushing as a rule.

Nate
Thank you!
 

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Brandon, FL
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12,648 Posts
Put hot water in a bucket and warm the resin and or hardener.

You can use a hair dryer to help get it kicking if it is too cold. I did this when i could see my breath.

You can use a heater with epoxy as the fumes are not flammable. No heater with any poly products!
 
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