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Discussion Starter #1
I’m starting to fly fish and want a rod of my own. Any help on finding a cheap and effective rod and reel? Thanks :)
 

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First, not trying to be a smarta--, but what is your definition of "cheap?" You can get a new 8wt Synch combo from Cabelas for about $160, or a Redington Crosswater combo, 9ft, 8wt for $170
Step up a Little bit and get a TFO NXT combo for about $210. The only limit is your budget.
You can get individual rod, reel, line, and get more specific and spend more, or go with a generic combo and save. But beware when buying combos. The line many times is a lesser quality line. It will work, and is good for practice, but you will benefit by getting a good quality line.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
First, not trying to be a smarta--, but what is your definition of "cheap?" You can get a new 8wt Synch combo from Cabelas for about $160, or a Redington Crosswater combo, 9ft, 8wt for $170
Step up a Little bit and get a TFO NXT combo for about $210. The only limit is your budget.
You can get individual rod, reel, line, and get more specific and spend more, or go with a generic combo and save. But beware when buying combos. The line many times is a lesser quality line. It will work, and is good for practice, but you will benefit by getting a good quality line.
I was just thinking along the lines of under 200... I’ve only fly fished for about 3 months and I’m liking it. Your your fine with asking. Also would 9wt, what would you recommend for a lot of trout, snook and redfish fishing a 9wt?
 

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You should do fine with a 7 or 8 wt, 9wt would be ok. Some like a 6 for trout and reds, I tend to go a little heavier because I use an 8wt Redington Predator with Behemoth reel for stripers and it doubles for my go-to salt rig. Your rod/line wt is as much about what size and type flies you will be casting as it is about fish size.

I was just thinking along the lines of under 200... I’ve only fly fished for about 3 months and I’m liking it. Your your fine with asking. Also would 9wt, what would you recommend for a lot of trout, snook and redfish fishing a 9wt?
 

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@clearwaterfisherman For what it’s worth... I was just in your shoes last spring and I’ll add that I’m just now getting decent at a double haul. The best advice I was given when I took a casting lesson at my local shop was to find a good, reputable, durable reel (I got a decent deal on a new/used Hardy,) a cheap rod (I found a Redington for $30), and have the shop match the line for your needs/skill. He told me that no matter how good I got, I would always want a newer, better rod and if I could cast accurately with a beginner rod, I’d be just fine down the road.
 

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@clearwaterfisherman For what it’s worth... I was just in your shoes last spring and I’ll add that I’m just now getting decent at a double haul. The best advice I was given when I took a casting lesson at my local shop was to find a good, reputable, durable reel (I got a decent deal on a new/used Hardy,) a cheap rod (I found a Redington for $30), and have the shop match the line for your needs/skill. He told me that no matter how good I got, I would always want a newer, better rod and if I could cast accurately with a beginner rod, I’d be just fine down the road.
Alright. Thank you for the comment man, will definitely use this.
 

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So here is my story that may help....a long time ago, I got interested in fly fishing thanks to a Florida Sportsman article written by Norm Zeigler about snook in the Sanibel surf. I extrapolated the info and translated it to my experience on Longboat Key and Anna Maria Island. My dad bought me a "cheap" 9 wt. outfit from BPS for around $200. With practice and experience, I got better and desired lighter, faster gear. Within 6 months I upgraded and have found myself doing so every so often since until I have what I have now which I'm very happy with. My advice is, if you are already into it, get the best outfit you can afford. Don't just go "cheap" just to get into it. If "cheap" is all you can afford, then you are golden. But don't short change yourself for the sake of saving a buck if you don't have to. There are differences between quality fly gear and "cheap" fly gear. You want a quality delivery system and it starts with the rod and the line. Find the rod that best suits you and find the line that casts best with that rod. Ultimately, the reel holds the line and backing and tends to be the flashy piece we all notice in pictures. Unless you are dealing with big backing fish (tarpon, permit, bonefish, big reds) the big dollar drag reels are overkill. Anything beyond a click drag that holds up well to saltwater will suffice. You'll get a million suggestions but one outfit I can think of is an Orvis Clearwater combo. I'd go with an 8 wt. Good all around weight for snook, reds, and trout and anything else >40#. A fly rod outfit is an extension of your body. You want it to be the best extension it can be.
 

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Yep. I would also throw out the TFO PRO(fessional) II. You can usually find them cheapish and that's the rod I started my Saltwater adventures with. I agree with Shadowcast. The rod and line will be your biggest help. I didn't learn this till I dropped some coin on a high quality line. Get a casting lesson from a certified fly casting instructor with a quality setup (borrowed from the shop if they allow it) and it will get you kicked down the right path.

BTW it very addictive. I have a whole wall full of rods :eek::D
 

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All good advice above. If you will be using it in salt water stay away from cast reels; machined & anodized reels are required. The cast reels will eventually bubble up with “cancers” beneath the powder coatn nomatter how diligently you inse and clean them. And enjoy yourself — fly fishing will provide so much more fun in an already great sport.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So here is my story that may help....a long time ago, I got interested in fly fishing thanks to a Florida Sportsman article written by Norm Zeigler about snook in the Sanibel surf. I extrapolated the info and translated it to my experience on Longboat Key and Anna Maria Island. My dad bought me a "cheap" 9 wt. outfit from BPS for around $200. With practice and experience, I got better and desired lighter, faster gear. Within 6 months I upgraded and have found myself doing so every so often since until I have what I have now which I'm very happy with. My advice is, if you are already into it, get the best outfit you can afford. Don't just go "cheap" just to get into it. If "cheap" is all you can afford, then you are golden. But don't short change yourself for the sake of saving a buck if you don't have to. There are differences between quality fly gear and "cheap" fly gear. You want a quality delivery system and it starts with the rod and the line. Find the rod that best suits you and find the line that casts best with that rod. Ultimately, the reel holds the line and backing and tends to be the flashy piece we all notice in pictures. Unless you are dealing with big backing fish (tarpon, permit, bonefish, big reds) the big dollar drag reels are overkill. Anything beyond a click drag that holds up well to saltwater will suffice. You'll get a million suggestions but one outfit I can think of is an Orvis Clearwater combo. I'd go with an 8 wt. Good all around weight for snook, reds, and trout and anything else >40#. A fly rod outfit is an extension of your body. You want it to be the best extension it can be.
Thank you so much! I will look in to these rods.
 

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Any of the big name brand combos should work fine. The combos are nice because by the time you piece a setup together separately it all adds up fast. The reel, backing, line, rod, etc are costly but when you purchase them all set up matched and ready to go not only do you get a nicely casting setup but it saves you money. Look on the discount sites like Sierra Trading Post, Backcountry, etc for a marked down Reddington combo and I bet you'll be happy. Once you decide you'll like it then you can let your hobby spiral completely out of control and end up having more money in rods and reels than you do in the truck you drove to the water.
 
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