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So I have been fishing with fly rod almost exclusively for the last 3 years... but been into it for the last 6 years.
I am what I call an "ever improving caster"... better than a novice but not an expert by any means.

I currently have three outfits- BVK 8 WT (reel and matching rod) with Airlflow bonefish (I am pretty sure that is the line)
Redington Predator 6 wt w Redington Vice reel and forget the line...
and a Scott Tidal 8 wt w Nautilus reel w Wulff BTT.

I love all three and cast all reasonably well... but each needs a little different stroke to get the optimal casting from it.

My oddity is that my BVK, which I probably cast the best- has a persistent issue with the hook catching the shooting head as it rolls out the loop.
I can make this rod throw 80 feet pretty easily and with very tight loops... but 1/3 of my casts, the hook will nail the line on the longer cast roll outs. Occasionally I will get the hook to hit the rod. I have tried to switch up my stroke speed, or cast with the rod less vertical, or even changing the rod tips final position at the end of the cash (higher and lower) to see if that will correct it. It doesn't seem to work.
I have in the past switched the BVK reel w the Nautilus and the issue goes away... but when I put the BVK rod reel together it seems to happen.

Is this something w the line perhaps? Is it my stroke not being in a straight enough line left to right!?!
I see the shooting head dance a lot side to side on the casts where the whole shooting head is out. The Wulff line does not seem to move as much left to right on the casts.

I love all three rods and cast them all pretty good... but this has really become something I am noticing a lot now that I lawn cast a lot more. Previously I thought it an oddity, but now I see a pattern.
 

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You most likely have your answer in your question. Something is not straight in your stroke with that setup. Downward motion creates the loop failure which in turn makes the collision. It could be stopping point, back too far, front too far. It could be dropping any part of the rod or arm on the final cast. I normally have my clients shorten their strokes a bit which should put the cast back on plane. Get some reps and then increase length of stroke. Sometimes using different lines may make timing different, which could lead to this issue but with the weight of the Wulff lines you should be feeling the load. Lastly if this problem is only manifesting when going long you may be overpowering the final cast. Technique and speed through hauling will always produce more than strength.
Ken
 

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Sounds like a tail. Almost always from less than smooth application of power. Could be related to too small of a casting arc. Could be creeping (and thus reducing your casting arc.) Could just be application of power too soon in the stroke. How's your backcast? I wouldn't be at all surprised if your backcast is kinda weak and creating some slack that you're having to take out on that forward stroke. As you go into your forward cast, you're actually just removing slack, and this means that in effect your forward casting arc is smaller - again resulting in a tail

That's my guess.
 

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So my thought is that if the issue goes away when you swap the BVK reel out for the Nautilus it is an issue of swing weight. What I mean is that the BVK reel is a few ounces lighter than the Nautilus. When you switch to the Nautilus reel, the weight of it is slowing your acceleration down and that is likely solving your issue. The proper solution isn't necessarily to change the reels permanently but as suggested above, smooth out the acceleration in your forward cast. I had a similar issue where I changed reels from a Lamson Guru II 3 to a Hatch 7+. I was casting great with the Lamson reel on my rod but when I switched to the Hatch that was almost 5 ounces heavier, I started to struggle a little with my cast. I had to really dissect my cast to figure it out. As a side note, I sold the 7+ and got a reel that was only only 2 ounces heavier and I never had an issue.
Incidentatlly, all of your rods are going to cast a little different. It is important to practice casting and always make a few practice casts as soon as you are on the water to get the feel of the one you are casting.
 

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Here are two examples of what is happening. Long story short you are not creating a straight line path. Imagine you standing indoors and running the tip of your rod along the ceiling. As the tip is farther from you in your forward and back cast the rod is straight but the tip travel the same plane as when the rod is over head and flexed.

The issue occurs when your acceleration is choppy. You flex the rod more or less during the duration of the stroke causing a dip in the rod tip path. When that happens, it translates to your line and creates a tailing loop. When it is more pronounced you hit the rod, when it is less pronounced you catch your line. When you are smooth in acceleration and clean stop, you throw a nice tight loop.

See the two images below.

I would start small. Pull off 30' and makes casts with no haul. Then go back to a single haul and then to a double, as you lengthen. If you do not feel comfortable with a double haul, do not sweat it. If you are trying to do too much, it can amplify the problems. More of a walk before you can run. When fixing casting strokes lessen the difficulty and moving parts to help clean up the mechanics. Also, dont go out do cast for 1 hr. It can be tiring and that magnifies or creates new bad habits.
 

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I Love Skinny Water
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So I have been fishing with fly rod almost exclusively for the last 3 years... but been into it for the last 6 years.
I am what I call an "ever improving caster"... better than a novice but not an expert by any means.

I currently have three outfits- BVK 8 WT (reel and matching rod) with Airlflow bonefish (I am pretty sure that is the line)
Redington Predator 6 wt w Redington Vice reel and forget the line...
and a Scott Tidal 8 wt w Nautilus reel w Wulff BTT.

I love all three and cast all reasonably well... but each needs a little different stroke to get the optimal casting from it.

My oddity is that my BVK, which I probably cast the best- has a persistent issue with the hook catching the shooting head as it rolls out the loop.
I can make this rod throw 80 feet pretty easily and with very tight loops... but 1/3 of my casts, the hook will nail the line on the longer cast roll outs. Occasionally I will get the hook to hit the rod. I have tried to switch up my stroke speed, or cast with the rod less vertical, or even changing the rod tips final position at the end of the cash (higher and lower) to see if that will correct it. It doesn't seem to work.
I have in the past switched the BVK reel w the Nautilus and the issue goes away... but when I put the BVK rod reel together it seems to happen.

Is this something w the line perhaps? Is it my stroke not being in a straight enough line left to right!?!
I see the shooting head dance a lot side to side on the casts where the whole shooting head is out. The Wulff line does not seem to move as much left to right on the casts.

I love all three rods and cast them all pretty good... but this has really become something I am noticing a lot now that I lawn cast a lot more. Previously I thought it an oddity, but now I see a pattern.
What weight line is on the Natilus vs the BVK
 

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2019 Jackson Mayfly, 2018 Jackson Kilroy DT
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Accelerate through your cast instead of abruptly at the start of your swing
Yes, I agree! You are creating a "tailing loop" by the missplacement of power in the casting stoke (too early). Try the smooth application of power throughout the casting stroke to an abrupt and positive stop.
 

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Here are two examples of what is happening. Long story short you are not creating a straight line path. Imagine you standing indoors and running the tip of your rod along the ceiling. As the tip is farther from you in your forward and back cast the rod is straight but the tip travel the same plane as when the rod is over head and flexed.

The issue occurs when your acceleration is choppy. You flex the rod more or less during the duration of the stroke causing a dip in the rod tip path. When that happens, it translates to your line and creates a tailing loop. When it is more pronounced you hit the rod, when it is less pronounced you catch your line. When you are smooth in acceleration and clean stop, you throw a nice tight loop.

See the two images below.

I would start small. Pull off 30' and makes casts with no haul. Then go back to a single haul and then to a double, as you lengthen. If you do not feel comfortable with a double haul, do not sweat it. If you are trying to do too much, it can amplify the problems. More of a walk before you can run. When fixing casting strokes lessen the difficulty and moving parts to help clean up the mechanics. Also, dont go out do cast for 1 hr. It can be tiring and that magnifies or creates new bad habits.
I like your suggestion about NOT practising for an hour! You'll end up getting tired and sloppy.
 

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Raise your elbow on the back cast. Its a tailing loop due to dropping your elbow and the fly is raising on the forward cast.

Other options: You can try an oval cast too if that doesn't work. Side arm the back cast and overhand the forward. Lastly look at leaders for the fly you are throwing. If the leader is messed up, the fly will sink on the forward and not turn over. I tie you my own leaders using the 50%-25%-25% method or 4-2-2.
 

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I Love Skinny Water
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I bet 90% of all fly fishers have closed, tailing,collapsing loops. We all do. I don't think of myself being a great fly caster but over the years I've caught over 30 different species on fly. Some how I got a fly in front of some stupid fish
So what if your loops aren't perfect. Just keep casting and you'll get it close to where your aiming and fish will bite your fly
 
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