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I Love Skinny Water
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went to Alabama and fished with @spc7669 we had multiple shots at muddying, bubbling carp. The water was high and muddy and the carp where in about 2’ of water. I put my fly right in the bubbles and mudding lots and no takes. I changed flies, let them sit, crawled them on the bottom,nothing. We couldn't tell which end was the tail or head
Had a great time but would like to know how to catch those fish if I have those conditions again
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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Hold your mouth right !

Haha.

They are finicky .

I’ve had them eat anything and I’ve had them snub everything.

But man when they eat !

It’ll make a believer out of ya !
 

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I went to Alabama and fished with @spc7669 we had multiple shots at muddying, bubbling carp. The water was high and muddy and the carp where in about 2’ of water. I put my fly right in the bubbles and mudding lots and no takes. I changed flies, let them sit, crawled them on the bottom,nothing. We couldn't tell which end was the tail or head
Had a great time but would like to know how to catch those fish if I have those conditions again
Those things are hard to catch on a fly. Best luck I've had was small darker flies but I also caught one on a popper once. Good luck and if you find a fly they like let us know.
 

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Capt Parker D
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I had a similar situation last week, had luck casting 5ft past and 6in to either side of the bubbles (guess which is the head) or watch for awhile to see which way they're moving. Let the fly sink for literally forever. Then its a really long slow strip, keeping it in the strike zone as long as possible, or what I call a redfish strip, a 3in pop and a solid pause. Hopefully this will help some. Oh, fly selection.... I like a leech imitation with some legs and big dumbells or a conehead
 

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I love fly-fishing for carp. They can be the most finicky eaters. I only fish them in clear water. Sight cast to them ( maybe have a dinner plate size son3, being generous) strip set when I see the eat. I primarily catch them off the bottom with small dark flies but I have caught them in middle of water column on leech patterns.
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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I use to live on a 3 acre pond loaded with 25 pound Asian carp. It took me a year to figure them out but once I did I’d fool them regularly. First off I bought a bag of fish pellets. Then I tied a fly on a size 16 trout fly hook and would spin buck tail on it to match the color and size of the pellet. I used my 4 WT rod with 4-6 pound tippet. Chum with the pellets and once they’re sipping them off the surface cast your fly into the mix and hold on. Worked everyday. Don’t move the fly at all, just let it drift naturally. When they eat it just slowly raise your tip until tight. A 25 pound carp fights like a juvie poon. Hard runs and jumps. Wonderful fish.
 

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Carp are fairly easy to catch on the fly once you grasp a principle or two and can tell a catchable fish from one to leave alone.

Feeders in water muddy enough and deep enough that you can't tell which end to cast to are long shot situations. In those cases, I am hunting the shallowest and most visible edge of the murk, lurking for any fish that wanders into sight-fishable range. They're feeding, obviously, but you have to put the fly on the nose, give it the escape twitch, see the fish jump on the fly, all pretty hard stuff to randomly pull off blind.

I like black when the visibility is poor. I like black when the visibility is good. Orange/rust is also good. Occasionally, they really want white and nothing else (not talking cottonwood seed slurpers or similar situations). I tie Backstabbers and Headstands, a couple leech patterns -- that's about all I ever need for carp.

I'll be honest: despite the amount of time I have spent on them (huge), I come back to hating them. Fly fishing for carp is making lemonade, but you can't make lemonade without lemons, and the sportfishing displaced by carp, and the habitat and water quality degradation from carp, are among the worst things that have happened to our lakes and rivers. One of my favorite places is right now getting choked by carp, the water a little murkier every year, certain weed beds vanishing, and carp in ever greater numbers. I do see an uptick in bowfishers around here, and to the extent they can be trusted to not poke holes in things like 5-pound bass (they can't), I approve.
 

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I agree with ”grass bass”. Carp are one of my favorite fish to target with a fly, but I have zero success when they are on the bottom in muddy water. Even when they are there in large numbers. I need to see the fish, cast in front and do the tease to get the take. The only chance I have in muddy water is when they are up clooping on the surface. Then using a dry fly or dry and 3” dropper may work.
I too am looking for the magical fly, strip, technique to have success on carp tailing in muddy water. I will let you know when I find it
Mike
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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As the jackass poling the boat on the particular trip, I was worried before we even launched. These fish are literally in my back yard and I’ve had zero success in high, muddy water. To top that off, the sun was very sporadic. I don’t think I visually identified any part of a fish the whole day.
It’s all good because we had fun and it was a nice day. Carp aren’t easy to catch in perfect conditions, but the alternative is to stay home.
 

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And of course when you really want to put somebody on fish, the conditions smack you right in the behind.
 

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'03 Ghost
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They're tough no matter what. I've caught a few (tidal Common carp) and they've all been actively mudding or tailing around, 2-3ft of water. Sink rate is important--I want the fly to get down quickly, but I don't want it so heavy that they spook when it hits the water.

I also found I got more positive responses and even some eats when I landed the fly to the side of their head (so the fly drops past their eyeball) instead of landing it right in front of their nose (blind spot). Agreed with darker flies or worm flies that stick up off the bottom. Definitely helps to figure out which is the business end before you cast.
 

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I Love Skinny Water
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks @brody3112 I tied a carp fly tonite. Lots of lead wrap on the front and hi-float fiber on the back made weedless. I did the lead wire because the lead eyes on my weed less flies caught the grass. Put FTD dubbing on it so it will land soft. I'll post a picture when the hard glue dries
 
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I Love microskiff.com!
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They're tough no matter what. I've caught a few (tidal Common carp) and they've all been actively mudding or tailing around, 2-3ft of water. Sink rate is important--I want the fly to get down quickly, but I don't want it so heavy that they spook when it hits the water.

I also found I got more positive responses and even some eats when I landed the fly to the side of their head (so the fly drops past their eyeball) instead of landing it right in front of their nose (blind spot). Agreed with darker flies or worm flies that stick up off the bottom. Definitely helps to figure out which is the business end before you cast.
I never though about angling for beside the head rather than on the nose. Will definitely use that next time.
 

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'03 Ghost
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Thanks @brody3112 I tied a carp fly tonite. Lots of lead wrap on the front and hi-float fiber on the back made weedless. I did the lead wire because the lead eyes on my weed less flies caught the grass. Put FTD dubbing on it so it will land soft. I'll post a picture when the hard glue dries
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These are my go-to carp flies. The XL bead chain gets the fly down quickly but has a bit more stealth than bulkier lead eyes. Also tied so that the chenille tails stick right up off the bottom. Obviously helps to know the forage in the zone you're fishing (crayfish, freshwater clams, worms, etc). The zones I fish are loaded with small worms like these.
 

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I Love Skinny Water
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've got some of those kinds like John Montana carp fly
 
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