Canoe or Kayak?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by SClay115, Jan 24, 2011.

  1. SClay115

    SClay115 Throwin' loops

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    So now that I have secured myself a solid job, I'd like to look into getting myself a non-petrol burning watercraft.

    Initially, I was set on a Kayak, sit on top style, but after some research on usage and pricing, I am considering looking into a canoe type vessel, whether it's a full fledged canoe or one of the open cockpit sit in kayaks I'm not sure.

    But I'd like to hear some of the pros and cons of owning and operating a canoe. I like the open cockpit aspect of it, and the outrageously inexpensive used market price tags. Seems like most quality SOT kayaks are way up there in price, while a relatively new, slightly used canoe is merely a few hundred. Obviously they don't physically "float" when swamped, like a SOT kayak, but I know there are some that have floatation built into them allowing them to be righted and then either manual bilged out, or whatever you can do to get the water out.

    I'm looking for something that is easy to move, load onto a roof top mounted rack, be able to stand in(with practice of course), and be fairly stable in general.

    So, canoe? Kayak? What do you folks think?

    Steve
     
  2. aaronshore

    aaronshore Well-Known Member

    I have had both, went from a canoe, to a SOT kayak, back to a canoe. The kayak is better for windy days with the lower profile, but the canoe is the way to go IMO. I flyfish 99.9% of the time, and stand in the canoe and cast easily. It can be poled or paddled. You have the option to have a guest as well. Plus you can bring more stuff if you need to camp or something. Also Native kayaks are similar to a canoe. Transport wise they are the same. I load my canoe on top of my truck with or without the topper on. For a great canoe at a killer price check out Indian River Canoes.
     

  3. Brett

    Brett > PRO STAFF <

    Beach launch through surf, paddling open waters that can get rough, go kayak.
    Inshore protected, calm water paddling, go canoe.
     
  4. cal1320

    cal1320 Well-Known Member

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    I have both also. Canoe for lakes and ponds, Kayak for lagoon. Native Ultimate would be best of both.
     
  5. Caretaker

    Caretaker Well-Known Member

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    Your fishing style and location make a huge difference.

    How far do you need to paddle on a given day? Kayaks are generally better for this and if wind comes up later in the day kayaks usually have the advantage.

    Lots of people stand in their kayaks. They are generally young, fit, and have good balance. The kayaks they stand in are mostly not good for long paddles, but if you are young and fit, you can paddle a long way.

    I've had a few kayaks and am looking to return to a canoe. Many are lighter than a kayak. American Eagle and Indian river make square back canoes that use small motors and can be poled, or rowed. I'm leaning toward trying one of these this year.


    Aaron: What model canoe are you using?
     
  6. Charlie

    Charlie I Love microskiff.com!

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    I personally like kayaks. But I like sit ins for touring. If I were to buy a paddle craft for fishing right now i'd go with a canoe.

    Canoes are great once you get all the paddle skills and water saftey stuff down. Lots of fun to paddle, comfortable, huge gear carrying capacity, and easy(ish) to stand in. I would think any canoe has better fishability than most general use kayaks. One of the really nice things about canoes is the capacity. As long as it's in a floating dry bag it can just be tossed in!

    As far as using them in rough water goes, that all depends on the ability of the person paddling them. With the right skill set it's possible to do almost everything you do in a kayak with a canoe. Wet re-entry is the hardest. Most canoes are positivly boyant, just not very. All canoes can have air bladers attacked to the front and back on the inside to increase boyance, but this steels space.

    Ultimatly if someone said they would buy me either a canoe or paddle board and which one did I want, i'd go with the canoe.
     
  7. SClay115

    SClay115 Throwin' loops

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    Thanks for the great replies so far.

    As far as fishing style goes, hopefully this can answer the question. I am predominantly a fly fisherman, and would be using the paddle craft to fish in relatively calm, protected waters. I have a skiff for the harsher conditions. So standing, casting, and poling the craft, whatever it turns out to be, would be on the requirement list.

    I do not believe I would ever be launching into rough waters from a beach, so I don't think that would ever be an issue.

    My biggest concern, for obvious reasons, is the simple fact that a SOT kayak is a buoy, and a canoe or canoe type craft is a bathtub, making deepwater recovery quite difficult. But hopefully I wouldn't have to worry about that too often.

    I do like the Native kayaks, the canoe-type ones, but it's hard for me to stomach the 500-600+ used price tag of one of those boats.

    Are there any canoes out there that have built in flotation chambers? I thought I had seen some online somewhere, but I do not recall where. It would be nice to have a craft that I know isn't going to hit the sea bed if something unfortunate happens.

    Steve
     
  8. Brett

    Brett > PRO STAFF <

    Most of the fiberglass ones have chambers
    either bow and stern or sealed benches.

    http://www.indianrivercanoemfg.com/backcountry.htm

    http://www.americraftboats.com/
     
  9. Charlie

    Charlie I Love microskiff.com!

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    He's right, but my only comment is these are ment to keep the boat from sinking. At this point it is still hard to empty and reenter the boat. One quick fix for this is to get additional floatation bags as shown here

    http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product_list.asp?deptid=1215

    Basicallly they get straped into the front and back of a canoe and add enough bouyancy that getting back in and bailing isn't too bad. However, I'm sure you're already seen the disadvantage: space. They steal bow and stearn space. However, if you paddle mostly solo i'd say go ahead and invest in them. There are two types of paddlers: Those who have flipped and those who soon will.  ;D
     
  10. WhiteDog70810

    WhiteDog70810 Mostly Harmless

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    If you stand and fish a lot, what about a Flatstalker? They aren't as cheap or easy to find used and they won't cover huge distances, but you already have a skiff for that. They look like they'd be a blast to fish out of.

    Nate
     
  11. ifsteve

    ifsteve Well-Known Member

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    I am thinking real hard about a Freedom Hawk kayak. Great stability for stand up flyfishing, plenty of room, light weight, and lots of good reviews. Have some spots that are going to be too far to paddle to but to shallow for the skiff so thinking of towing the yak then getting out and fishing the real real skinny stuff. :)
     
  12. Charlie

    Charlie I Love microskiff.com!

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    Those are sweet looking kayaks! Always wanted to try one out when I worked for a kayak shop, but was busy cleaning boat, and to test it ment to have to clean it  ;D There are some REALLY nice features in it, including the leaning bar, the anchor system and the break apart push pole!