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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't know what the issue is, but so far this summer I have seen tons of snook and have not been able to get them to bite any of the typical lures I have caught them on before. I don't know if I'm doing anything wrong but I'm tempted to start using live bait again just to catch some fish this is getting old.

Paddle tails, flukes, rapala, various fake shrimp.....Nothing. Was just out this morning and saw snook everywhere right on shore, caught some jacks on the paddletail but the snook were not interested at all what gives?
 

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Maybe they see you.

I dropped from 30lb to 25 lb flouro last year and got a bunch more hook ups for a couple days and lost like half the fish. Went back to 30.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah I'm using 30lb now. And I can usually tell when they see me because they will take off pretty quick....A few saw me but most of them were just going up and down the shoreline like they usually do in the morning (I was beach fishing this morning not on the skiff). Will try my lighter setup next time with a smaller lure and see what happens.

Maybe I should get a fly rod :LOL:
 

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I don't know what the issue is, but so far this summer I have seen tons of snook and have not been able to get them to bite any of the typical lures I have caught them on before. I don't know if I'm doing anything wrong but I'm tempted to start using live bait again just to catch some fish this is getting old.

Paddle tails, flukes, rapala, various fake shrimp.....Nothing. Was just out this morning and saw snook everywhere right on shore, caught some jacks on the paddletail but the snook were not interested at all what gives?
We're getting into their heavy mating cycle. The beach fish in particular only feed once or twice per day. When they go off, they will do so spectacularly for about 30-60 minutes and then turn back off. If you can find them under deep docks or mangroves, they are usually much less shy to eat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
They can be ridiculously leader shy, saw it first hand and had to experience it to beiieve it. 30 lb flouro no bite. 15 ate it almost every time.
I might just try that, especially on the beach since there’s no structure to worry about. I always defer to 20lb or more because I’m usually fishing around something that can snap light leaders.
 

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In addition to the leader size, perhaps consider leader length. I think that braid main line can vibrate in the water and of course the snook sense that through their lateral line. Maybe use a longer length of leader. Also might want to consider your retrieve and direction--baitfish general do not swim directly at a predator. Instead, they are trying to flee. So, make sure you work your bait with that in mind. I know it's frustrating when they seem to have lock jaw! Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Going back out to the same spot tomorrow, Ft.Desoto beach on the north end right at the inlet. Gonna take a light and heavier rod, and use the heavy rod to chuck out some bait cut or live if I catch any on the light rod.

Saw tons of Pompano as well so I'm gonna try a Pompano jig, and I imagine with that I'll get some Ladyfish as well in which case I'll cut it up for some snook or whatever else wants to eat it lol. Also gonna try some smaller lures on the light rod and see how the snook will react to that.
 

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A few thoughts about snook with lockjaw.. The first is simply this... if you've spotted a snook (or any other fish up shallow), you were probably seen a moment or two before you spotted that fish... Some fish don't show how aware they are - you simply won't get them to bite.... Give a thought or two to exactly where you were when you spotted the fish (and how close, how clear the water was, what the wind was doing... etc.). All of that contributes to success or failure. At night for instance fish holding in the shadows up under a bridge are very approachable - as long as you're not right in front of them... Those same fish in a docklight are super aware of their surroundings (and if you're on foot your best bet will be not to set foot on the dock that light is attached to...) -if possible... I tell my anglers at night that only the first two or three casts at docklight fish have a good shot at a bite in my area... After that, you could cast until your arm falls off with nothing much to show for it. Many times we'll move away to some other docklight then return an hour or two later to try our luck (if the fish are still there later on in the tide...).

One other trick that can make a real difference... Any time you find snook or tarpon or other prizes feeding... make a note of the exact time... Then when you can compare when they were biting with exactly what the tide was doing that day (or night)... you just might find a pattern (and if they turn on an hour before high tide today (or tonight), maybe, just maybe they'll be there and biting on another occasion - just before high tide (or maybe two hours into the falling tide - whatever it takes). We fish tarpon in rivers a lot and they seem very predictable - once you have some idea of when they like to feed...
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
So we went to the same spot this morning and....



Was a tad earlier this time (about 7:15 instead of 8) and the current was going good, decent waves, saw him come up through the waves with another one about the same size, and I tossed the paddle tail with some pro cure on it in front of them and he ate it right away, probably 10 feet in front of me.

Once the waves died down about a half hour later there were big Snook everywhere but they just stopped biting. Caught a Ladyfish and cut it up for bait, had no luck with that either. Caught a few Jacks, then switched to the Pompano jig and caught the biggest Whiting I've ever caught, then also caught a nice size Pompano. Unfortunately no cooler with us so I put him back. Then after my brand new jig flew off the reel when the braid snapped (no clue why) we called it a day.
 
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