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Discussion Starter #1
Let's start off by cutting to the chase - I'm going to put this project up on the classifieds, but I wanted to post the pictures of the project here for three reasons. First, who doesn't love build threads? Second - I made two minor modifications to the standard FS 18 low sheer design that may be of interest to folks considering jumping into their own build. Third, I used an unusual combination of materials that will likely be of interest to builders.

Why am I selling it? I love the process of building the skiff, but I love actually fishing even more. I really want to spend this year fishing, not finishing the skiff. Free time is my most limited resource, so I have decided to purchase a commercial skiff (found from this site) rather than pour another 60 - 100 hours into the skiff.

Luckily for you guys, I've got a stockpile of build pictures, so no delayed gratification needed.

First, the obligatory "empty garage and strongback build pictures":
 

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Discussion Starter #2
It didn't take me long to make the project overly complicated:
Rather than cut out the frames from the plans, I transferred drew up the frames and cut them out on a CNC router. The router only has about a 2' x 2' cut volume, so I had to build the frames out of a few different puzzle pieces.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
In the shot above, you can see on frame B where I extended the gunnel location out by about 3". The reason for this is to build in some modest spray rails in an attempt to make the skiff run a little drier.

While this step took a little extra planning and thinking, it didn't add a significant amount of time. The rounded chine option, however, does add more work (cutting, stitching, gluing and most certainly fairing).
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
More build pics, not really in a chronological order but generally all this was about the same time.

Stitched, gaps filled. Seams glassed, then glassed with the wide cloth.

On the transom, you can see the first materials deviation. For the build, I used okume plywood for the panels that would need to bend (be "developable") but for the flat frames I used divinycell. H80 for the interior bulkheads and higher density foam for the transom, transom knees, etc. Going 100% composite isn't recommended by the designer because the need for more layers of glass (to build sufficient impact strength) kills any weight savings found using the foam core in the hull.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It takes two seconds to look at these pictures, but the fairing step is definitely very tedious, very labor intensive, and not very photogenic.

Five plus rounds of fairing, three rounds of System 3 two part primer.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Once the hull was primed, we built a cradle, flipped the boat, and put the strongback on casters.

Then, more progress on the inside. Sanding any drips from the stitching process, glassing the inside, glassing in stringers and bulkheads.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Once the stringers and bulkheads are in, you get a sense for how strong and stiff the boats built using the stitch and glue method really are. The 18 foot long structure probably weighs less than 140 pounds, but just feels solid.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
I foamed the cockpit area under the sole as well as the outboard section of the front compartment between the stringers and the hull. There about 900 pounds of positive displacement in there.

Also, you can see the two chase tubes running from the back section to the front hatch...one side for fuel line, one for wiring. Both runs have conduit bends (not sharp 90') so that - hopefully - running lines is painless.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
For the sole, I used 1" thick nidacore rather than plywood. This approach is lighter and when glassed on both sides, much, much stiffer. I had read other build threads with complaints of soft spots in the sole. I didn't want that to be the case here.

Here I glassed the underside of the nidacore, then bonded that to the sole at the hull edges and along the stringers. Followed that up by glassing the top of the as well as about 4" of hull side.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Even through 1" nidacore and two layers of biax, you can see the stringer grid. (Interestingly, it shows up in pictures more clearly than when you look at it)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
For the front hatch area, I added some scrap divinycell foam over the flotation foam and glassed it in. Also added some supports for the fuel tank, leaving easy path for water to drain back and plenty of air circulation.
 

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Looks like a great build. How far did you get with it and how much are you asking?
 

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I’m just going to right up front.. this is badass and I am going to copy this..

I have built a couple of FS18’s and I just recently built the Conchfish. I will say that the FS18 is a dryer boat than the CF. Now with you adding these spray rails, I can’t imagine how much dryer this will be. It looks awesome!!
 
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I’m just going to right up front.. this is badass and I am going to copy this..

I have built a couple of FS18’s and I just recently built the Conchfish. I will say that the FS18 is a dryer boat than the CF. Now with you adding these spray rails, I can’t imagine how much dryer this will be. It looks awesome!!
I wanna see foam core, carbon innegra/ basalt layup and a vacuum bag this time! I’ll help ya set up a cheap system!;)
 
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