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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I took the plunge a couple of months ago during football season and bought an old hull + trailer for $500 because I liked it's shape (knew I would have to wait until season was over to start work - I coach for a local HS). Here is the original CL ad:
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Anyway, I started working about 8 days ago on the trailer first (wife agreed to the project only if the trailer was safe first). So I re-did the leaf springs, seals and bearings (plus added bearing buddies), jack, winch, bunks, rollers and lights.

Last week I bought a 2006 2 stoke 25hp yamaha short shaft - it looks very clean and runs very smooth (electric and manual start in case I end up adding a battery to the skiff).

Now it is time to start working on the hull itself. I took old hardware off: cleats, old rub rail, and the transom bracket.
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The transom bracket was too tall (20") for the short shaft motor, and I needed to take it off to start sanding down the inside of the hull.

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Hmmm that doesn't look like a good sign. Took a brass sleeve that was barely glued into the drain tube to find:
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Looks wet to me. In addition, there is delamination

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The transom feels incredibly solid. I have slammed my rather large fist at it at full force and it did not make a sound, did not move, and felt strong. But since I am at the beginning there is no need to skip essential steps. Do not want to end up like @tcaseycook (no offense man, I truly feel bad for you that you found out about a bad transom at the end of a refurb).

Any input that you may have along the way, or if you see me screwing something up, please let me know. Here is one more shot of the hull (please excuse the mess of the garage). Although she is only 14' long, the 61" width (at the gunnels not the bottom) makes for a pretty roomy boat and I like the idea of restoring a 1967 ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Well, it only took an hour and a half, but I got the transom wood off...
The transom was 1.5" thick and made of two pieces of 3/4" ply.
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(I made that cut to get it out easier)

Here is the outside layer of the 3/4" ply still attached (with non stainless wood screws through the hull). Notice the rotten area on the top right (there was no through bolt or screw there).
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The good news, because the sides of the plywood were never bedded in, it made it much easier to rip out...

Here is the inside view of the layer of fiberglass skin that I left
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Still have to clean it up before I can install the new transom. Some of the removal process was a bit too rough and I will have to go back and re-glass some areas - notice the top corners, and the drain hole in this photo, oops:

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I really want to take the entire transom skin off and start with new fiberglass but everything that I have read says to keep the old skin on. The last owner did some patch jobs that look terrible around the corners of the transom. Has anyone replaced the outside skin as well?
 

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Well, it only took an hour and a half, but I got the transom wood off...

I really want to take the entire transom skin off and start with new fiberglass but everything that I have read says to keep the old skin on. The last owner did some patch jobs that look terrible around the corners of the transom. Has anyone replaced the outside skin as well?
Don't cut the skin away. You will make your life much harder if you do. Cut the plywood (or whatever core you are using) to size and bed it in epoxy thickened with wood flour. You can rig clamps or just some basic 1x4 battens and screw from the outside in to pull the core tight to the skin. Once that has cured, you can sand the outside flush, fair it in, and lay a clean layer or two of glass over the whole thing, inside and outside. Also, don't forget to tab in the core to the inside of the hull with some heavier glass (12oz biax or something along those lines.)

There is a great transom rebuild tutorial on boatbuildercentral. Check it out. Helped me big time on mine.
 
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I cut away the skin on my rebuild but left a tab of about two inches all the way around. If you don't have to cut it away, then don't. Its not impossible to make it look right but it will test your fiberglass and fairing skills.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Don't cut the skin away. You will make your life much harder if you do.
I spoke with Jacquez from Bateau/BoatBuilderCentral on Friday. I asked him the same question and showed him this photo which shows the previous owners transom rebuild (shotty job)


He agreed that there was no reason to keep this layer of skin since 1. it was cracking at multiple points where it contacted the actual hull, and 2. it was not quality work to begin with (especially since it was only polyester resin and not epoxy). He said that the biggest reason to keep the old skin on is the nice cosmetic finish that the factory produces, but since this transom had been redone, it did not matter, and the epoxy bond that I will use will be much stronger than the poly one on there now...

With his advice, I cut the old skin off, and started sanding off the old chunks of wood transom that were still attached to the hull (wet still), and layers of mat and poly resin.



There were non-stainless screw that the previous owner used to attach the transom:



I then cut two pieces of 3/4 marine fir to correct size, dry fitted it, cut the transom down to 15" in the middle with a radius to help with laying the glass in easier later.


looks much cleaner!

mixed 12 oz of epoxy, brushed a layer on each piece of 3/4", then added woodflour to the left over epoxy and using a plastic fairing scraper laid a layer of the think epoxy. put the two pieces together and added a bit of weight



Still have a bit of sanding to do on the hull (bottom and outside sides), then bed the transom, fillet, tab insides and out with 12oz biax tape (Jacqez showed me how to stagger the outside layers so that it ends up fairly neat and will only require a bit of fairing), and epoxy two layers of 12oz biax on both outside and inside...
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
After 2+ hours of sanding the last few days, I got around to some glass work today. Mixed up quite a bit of thickened epoxy to bed and fillet in the transom (I'd say probably close to 18oz).
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Used a 1.25" washer to make the fillets


2 layers of staggered 6" 12oz biax tape on sides and bottom, then a layer of 12oz biax on the whole inside of the transom (although I think I mistakenly got the 17oz biax cloth - at least that's the way it felt soaking up all that epoxy)


Here is a closeup of the work


Going to let this cure for 2 days (won't have time to work tomorrow), then flip the hull, sand the bottom and glass the outside of the transom.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Got the boat flipped and started sanding
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found a crack in the strake, fortunately the strakes were added after the hull was pulled from mold, so there is no leak, but still has to be fixed.

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here is the crap lamination done by last owner, honestly some of this stuff i just jammed a flathead screwdriver and pried it off

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someone tried to beef up the strake with woven roving - no fairing

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and paint is peeling because it was just slapped on (probably no sanding after the "repair")



transom is prepped for outside skin
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i hate the rolled gunnel, it makes it hard to sand in the crack.

continued to sand. sanding sucks. its warm again. bunny suit + respirator + enclosed safety goggles = foggy, sweaty, dirty, tedious work.



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two overlapping layers of tabbing, then a complete skin.

Yes, i know that small section is not laminated properly. So i stopped after the first layer, let it cure for 2 days, sanded back to the wood in that spot, sanded rest of outside skin, recoated with epoxy, small patch in that spot, then another complete layer of biax over entire transom. It is curing right now, in a couple of days i will post the final results. then sand again, and skim coat (is that the proper term?) with epoxy...

The work is slow now, especially the sanding/grinding of the old paint. I could pay a kid down the street $100 bucks to finish it for me, but i dont want gouges or holes in the hull, so it will be me in the bunny suit, sweating, and taking frequent breaks to clean safety goggles (both dust on outside and condensation inside)... This part of the work is always no fun, but it will be worth it in the end.

Anyone ever tried to pressure wash the layer of paint off? I don't want to use chemical strippers but I also want this part to be over with.
 

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Haven't found a way to avoid the dirty work. It sucks for sure and is the worst part of the process but you hit the nail on the head, It will be worth it in the end. Here was my sanding project. Brutal..

View media item 249
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
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Sanded with 60 grit on a palm sander hooked up to shop vac
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Applied a single coat of epoxy

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4 hours later while first layer was still tacky, I applied a second layer of epoxy. Will let it cure, then sand with 100, 150, 220 grit.

Then sand rest of bottom of hull, prime and paint - going with the cheap option - Rustoleum topsider in battleship gray for bottom. White for decks and sole. At $13/qt, it is by far the cheapest option and it looks to give a reasonable results... I'm going for workboat finish. Will probably add some hardener to it. Maybe something like this: http://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/majic-catalyst-hardener-1-2-pint
 

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For the bottom, you could get a bag of graphite from Bateau that you mix into your epoxy that you coat the bottom with, much tougher than paint, and cheap.
JC
 

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First, epoxy with graphite is UV proof because it's opaque, the mix is 1-3 using dry weight (volume)measure for the graphite, I'd guess that you could do three coats rolled on with a foam roller at about 6oz epoxy per coat. Then you have a coating that's hard as a rock that's very easy to repair if needed.
JC
 
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Discussion Starter #16
First, epoxy with graphite is UV proof because it's opaque, the mix is 1-3 using dry weight (volume)measure for the graphite, I'd guess that you could do three coats rolled on with a foam roller at about 6oz epoxy per coat. Then you have a coating that's hard as a rock that's very easy to repair if needed.
JC
Excellent! Thank you for this info! I may pick some graphite up from Fiiberglass Florida on Tuesday since they are just around the corner from my work.
 

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Just for reference, I think it was $12 for a bag that would do several boats at Bateau.
JC
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Definitely do the graphite. I used it on a Gheenoe I'm re-doing. I did not use it on my skiff, but wish I had. I put Gatorglide on it and for what it costs I'm not that impressed with its durability...
The graphite was like $7 a pound which is enough to do probably three skiffs.
How many coats did you use on this Gheenoe?
 
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