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Boondock fishing

588 Views 14 Replies 10 Participants Last post by  finbully
So retirement is quickly approaching for me. I’m planning much more fishing than during my work years and this includes places I’ll keep my boat in the water overnights. Many of these places don’t have power to recharge batteries which typically need a charge every 2 - 3 days. I was resigned to pulling my boat out of the water to do this with my motor home which is kind of a first world PITA and charge at the campsites. It recently dawned on me to try one of the backup power supply systems that are marketed for home and camping use. I just bought an Ecoflow Delta 2 for this purpose. Maybe I should have asked before I took the plunge if anyone else uses something similar. Oh well my unit arrives in a couple of days so I’ll be conducting my own testing primarily charging my two Group 31 TM batteries. The unit has 1800 peak watts and 1024 watt hour capacity so it should give top off charges every couple of days. It provides 120 volt, 20 amp output which is perfect for my 20 amp 3 bank charger. Anyone else do this? I’ll follow up with my test results since I didn’t find anything with this particular use on YouTube. I’m hoping it’s a game changer in that I won’t need to break camp to pull the boat out of the water every couple of days.
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Interested to hear your experience but it definitely seems that lithium batteries and a PowerPole Charge or something similar would work well for your application.
 
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Now that I got some rest and looked at this with fresh eyes, I know where I went wrong.

I still stand by my formula above.... my variables were just wrong. We 20 amps (at 12v) is the output of the charger. What we need to know is the input required by the charger (at 120v).

I bet that value is less than 20a. That's a lot of amps.... more than many appliances pull. And 20 amps at 120v would probably test the wiring and breakers in many older homes.
 

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Doing what's needed so that your boat's charging system can be used to re-charge your trolling batts is probably a pretty good solution for most... If I were in your shoes there's one other alternative I'd look into... Purchase a small Honda generator (I'd be looking at the 2000 series) - very compact, has a variety of non-boating uses, and Honda makes good gear... The unit isn't very large, it's gas powered and runs quietly... Good luck whichever you choose - and post up how it goes for you. I'm pretty sure there will be folks interested in what you come up with for that problem...
 

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I have a harbor freight very small generator that cost $89. When I went to the everglades...after a day of fishing... I would park my skiff in the back of the campground and crank up the generator plugged into my onboard charger. 30 minutes and a cocktail later I had fully charges batteries for the next day...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Doing what's needed so that your boat's charging system can be used to re-charge your trolling batts is probably a pretty good solution for most... If I were in your shoes there's one other alternative I'd look into... Purchase a small Honda generator (I'd be looking at the 2000 series) - very compact, has a variety of non-boating uses, and Honda makes good gear... The unit isn't very large, it's gas powered and runs quietly... Good luck whichever you choose - and post up how it goes for you. I'm pretty sure there will be folks interested in what you come up with for that problem...
Thank you Captain. I have a 1000 w Honda. It is great for such use but I don't want to leave it at the dock(s) running while I'm having an after fishing cold barley pop at camp. I'll see how this silent solution works as past history tells me I can go 2-3 days without having to recharge the TM batteries.
 

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I use to stay at a campground in the Outer Banks of NC that didn't have running water or power. I have often thought about how to charge a battery if I brought my boat down there. With the bay boat...no way. 4 big batteries.

with the Gheenoe two batteries could be used for a multi-day trip. One battery in the boat and other one charging off of solar during the day. Swap batteries each day. It could sustain you for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Now that I got some rest and looked at this with fresh eyes, I know where I went wrong.

I still stand by my formula above.... my variables were just wrong. We 20 amps (at 12v) is the output of the charger. What we need to know is the input required by the charger (at 120v).

I bet that value is less than 20a. That's a lot of amps.... more than many appliances pull. And 20 amps at 120v would probably test the wiring and breakers in many older homes.
Thanks for the feedback and information. The Ecoflow battery's input is:
Font Rectangle Circle Brand Art

There are both 15 and 20 amp 120 v outputs on the unit. My onboard charger is 20 amps. Also, the package can be expanded to make it 2048 Wh (total) or 3040 Wh depending on which expansion battery is connected. I figured I'd try the "base" unit first and test it at home before spending $ on expansion batteries.
 

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Okay, time for an update. I received the Ecoflow Delta 2 in good order. So, the following morning, I ran my 24 V Rhodan TM for 12 hours nonstop around medium speed (not in the water so less resistance on the batteries I know). Also, I turned on everything electrical on the boat except the pumps for the same 12 hours. TM batteries were quite low but not low enough to shut off the Rhodan. Battery voltage remained above 12 V on the engine/accessory’s battery. Gauge for the twin TM batteries (AGM Group 31) was as low as it could indicate. So, I shut everything off and plugged my 3 bank on board charger (Marine Pro 20 amp) into one of the 20-amp receptacles on the Ecoflow and let it rip. At first, the boat charger was pulling mid 200 watts but after about 1/2 hour the watt pull decreased. It fell to 100 watts or so for about 4.5 hours (so the Ecoflow was working for 5 hours) when the TM battery gauge indicated full, and the engine/accessories battery indication went to final conditioning mode. The Ecoflow was indicating under 10% remaining when I shut everything off. I did not want to totally discharge any of my boat batteries or the Ecoflow itself. I then plugged the Ecoflow into a wall plug (20 amp) and it began charging. It too less than 1.5 hours for it to charge to full, just as their advertising says. Overall, I am really impressed, and this solution will work great for me when there is no shore power. I seriously doubt I would ever run the TM even half as long as I did for this test in 1 day of fishing.


I know the PowerPole unit does a good job for what it is designed but remember, it will only charge batteries using power from the boat's alternator. I seriously doubt I would get the watt hours to top off my batteries during the runs I make with my boat as I am able with the Ecoflow after a day of fishing. Also, the versatility of the Ecoflow solution is much more flexible than the PowerPole on board power distribution system (use it anywhere). I don’t have anything business-wise to do with Ecoflow nor am I a PowerPole hater (have two on my bass boat) I’m just sharing an idea and test (admittedly not too scientific) for others that may benefit from a charging solution when there is not shore power.
 
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