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Getting my 11 yr old daughter some fly casting lessons this fall. Want to get her a rod to add some excitement, but could use another 7 or 8 weight myself so it doesn't need to be entry level quality. I'll end up using it more than her I'm sure. In my head I'm thinking a 8'4" rod(Scott) might be easier to learn on and develop better technique but wanted opinions from those who have taught. Rods I'm considering so far are 7 or 8 weight TFO Mangrove, 7 weight Sage X, 7 weight NRX+, Scott Sector 7 or 8 weight, Scott Tidal 8 weight. Other than a 10 weight Mangrove(which I like quite a bit), and an 8 weight Tidal, I don't experience with any of these rods. No where local carries much other than Loomis.

Primary use will be tailing redfish in the marsh. Have an 8 weight setup which is why I'm leaning towards a 7. That and more feel in the 7 and lighter, for her to learn on. Thoughts?
 

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6wt with a fighting butt like a TFO Mangrove. Get a lightweight reel, like a Lamson Guru and put Rio Redfish or some other + weight line so there is more feel and feed back from the rod to her hand.

There is no comparison of the Mangrove to the X or the Sector. The Sector is a very fast cannon of a rod. It wants high line speed and probably isn't the best rod for a beginner to pick up and try to learn on. The X is a little more forgiving and will load a little deeper in the blank than the Sector but you are still looking at a $900 rod for an 11 year old. The Tidal is a great rod, like a slightly softer version of the Meridian (one of the best rod's they ever made IMO). My 13yr old has started fly fishing just a few months ago. I bought him a 691 TFO BVK. It is a fast rod but very light in hand. He's not getting a lot of feed back from the rod and I need to put a + weight line on his reel, probably going to get SA Grand Slam. What ever rod you choose, I would suggest getting a rod for her and not so much a rod you are going to use and let her borrow.
 

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Might consider TFO Lefty Kreh professional II. It is slower and has feel. JMHO.
Joe
 
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The 8 wt sector I own is certainly not a "very fast cannon of a rod". If anything it is deeper bending and has more feel than any other graphite 8wt I've cast. It is a very forgiving rod and very easy to cast........but the price makes it a dubious entry level rod for a kid (where learning curve breakage is very possible). I would steer away from the shorter Scotts. Although they have a lighter swing weight they are specialty rods designed to throw heavy short headed lines with tight loops and high line speed......hardly the place for an 11yo to start. Most authorities advise learning on a 6wt and certainly for a kid this makes even more sense. If you are buying for yourself this video might be helpful. Note that he is casting a 7wt line in it.

 

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I don't see any reason you can't learn on a seven.
I'm self taught on a 9' bamboo rod when I was 8 years old.
It's in the neighbor hood of a 5 or 6 wt.

How's she cast your 8?
 

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6wt rods with a forward taper line (SA redfish or SA grand slam) and light weight reel or 5 wt with SA bonefish line. NRX or NRX+ She or you can use these rods for most saltwater sight casting for a long time.
 

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That is a kind and generous offer. Thank you, but truth is I want a rod that I will enjoy fishing with to, so I'm going to pass on it. As far as the Sector it gets so many contradicting reviews as fast vs not-fast. Makes me curious and want to cast it. Unfortunately no Scott dealers in Chas anymore. Everyone keeps saying 6 wt but much of our flood tides are in the summer ,in the later afternoon, and the wind is a factor.
 

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Something moderate fast should be a little easier for her learn on. If you are getting her casting instructions you might want to contact the instructor on the best action and weight and then go from there.
 

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That is a kind and generous offer. Thank you, but truth is I want a rod that I will enjoy fishing with to, so I'm going to pass on it. As far as the Sector it gets so many contradicting reviews as fast vs not-fast. Makes me curious and want to cast it. Unfortunately no Scott dealers in Chas anymore. Everyone keeps saying 6 wt but much of our flood tides are in the summer ,in the later afternoon, and the wind is a factor.
All saltwater fly rods are marketed as fast action. They are all fast action compared to a full flex dedicated dry fly rod or a mid flex streamer/nymph rod. When looking at saltwater rods you then have to break all those down into some sub groups. Medium fast, fast and ultra fast. Whatever. I've owned a bunch of 9 wt and from slowest to fastest they go something like this Solar, Sector, Zephrus, Exocett, Asquith, Method. Within each series there are variations as well.

You can look at the Yellowstone Angler Shootouts deflection charts for some guidance. Not sure how scientific it is.

Some of the disagreement might have to do with the fact that the Sector is a fairly easy rod to cast. When more people can time their cast correctly, flex deep into the rod, haul at the right time and let it rip the rod feels just as fast as a faster rod that is more difficult to cast.

Also, to figure out comparative action you need to be comparing with similar lines. It can all be hard to figure out if you aren't casting side by side. Also, aerializing a long head will enable you to tell a lot about the action. On my 6 wt Sector I use it only for practice and I'm trying to aerialize 60' or more of DT line. Not really a fishing cast but I can feel the cork move at that point. I would imagine that will not happen with the "cannons" of the flats.
 

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BVK with SA Amplitude line or the mangrove with bonefish (regular head) or the pro II All great rods and not a bank killer note. any lighter lamson reel in 6 wt would be perfect! lots of room to grow in that case!
 

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Taught my kids when they were 7 and 5 with a cheap generic 5 wt from a sports store. I got the rod on sale for $20 and it was actually a pretty good rod. Like someone said it is the Indian and not the arrow. Now they are 22 and 20 and when I ask them if they want go fishing they either say they have something else to do or want to use conventional gear. Tip #1 enjoy the time you have now with them. Tip #2 never introduce them to "conventional equipment"..
 

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...Everyone keeps saying 6 wt but much of our flood tides are in the summer ,in the later afternoon, and the wind is a factor.
There’s is a reason why so many people are saying get her a moderate action 6wt. You probably won’t teach a beginner how to drive in a Corvette so the same goes with the fly rod. Get her something she can learn on and get yourself that flood tide rod. You can get a TFO Professional 6wt and an Axiom IIx for less than a Sage X or the Scott Sector...
 
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I started my daughter who is 11 on a 7'6" 5wt St Croix. The 9 foot rod was to much to handle. Plus the little rod is a fun change of pace.
 

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There’s is a reason why so many people are saying get her a moderate action 6wt. You probably won’t teach a beginner how to drive in a Corvette so the same goes with the fly rod. Get her something she can learn on and get yourself that flood tide rod. You can get a TFO Professional 6wt and an Axiom IIx for less than a Sage X or the Scott Sector...
Agreed. I was thinking this today. If the OP wants a rod he should get one.
 
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