Dedicated To The Smallest Of Skiffs banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking at getting my first fly combo. Starting out, I will just be throwing at flood tide fish. I was thinking of getting a 6 wt, but is an 8 wt easier to cast for a newbie? Thinking of getting something cheaper like the crosswater/orvis encounter/cabelas etc. to start with, and after a couple years possibly upgrade to a nicer outfit in the opposite wt I start with. I plan on taking a few lessons, but curious if generally speaking an 8 is easier to learn on than a 6–or vice versa?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
Either would be fine to learn with, but my opinion is the 8 will give you more versatility in the salt where the 6 is a bit of a specialty tool in that realm. Lessons are an excellent idea and can save you the headache of unlearning any bad habits you may pick up on your own. You might even see if it's possible to take lessons before you commit to your first rod.
 

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
3,513 Posts
Start with an 8wt...you'll have more reach on windy days.

What are you looking to spend?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
100% agree that a lesson or 2 will help you avoid forming bad habits. Can only learn so much on YouTube. An in person instruction is always best. 8wt will get the most use.
 

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Don’t have a hard number in mind—likely under $200, but the cheaper the better. I wouldn’t dismiss a $100 combo. I understand you get what you pay for, but starting out I will throw it a handful of times at flood tides and low tide reds. I figure if I get hooked, I will invest in some quality gear once I am a little less of a novice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
8wt will be your best option, it will have more rods/combos to choose from. It will not be as easy to learn to cast on. I think getting a quality casting rod will make a bigger difference. And there are some options that are surprisingly nice casting in that budget range.
On a side note when looking at kits make sure you get a proper line. Most kits come with a coldwater fly line, of some of the lower end stuff comes with a level fly line (not easy to cast). It will be tough to cast when it is hot outside. Cabales, and the Scientific Anglers frequency are good budget lines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
305 Posts
I don’t have a recommendation for any combo but can tell you DO NOT get the Orvis Encounter combo. It will not handle the salt and Orvis has a separate crappy warranty for the Encounter which they will disallow for any trace of saltwater usage.
 

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
289 Posts
Cast a Redington predator 8wt, when clients cant cast their $800+ Super fast rods I hand them the Predator/Grande/Summer Redfish combo and casting improves dramatically and dont need 7-8 false casts to hit a fish 30-40ft from the boat.
 

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
3,513 Posts
I like my Redington Predator 6wt. Its an excellent back up to my Sage ONE.

I also like my Orvis Clearwater 5wt. The 8wt may be worth a look.

I would recommend the OP keep an eye on the used market for something in 8wt.
 
  • Like
Reactions: prinjm6

·
I Love microskiff.com!
2021 HB Professional Tunnel
Joined
·
545 Posts
Nothing wrong with starting out with a beginner set-up, The ones you mentioned will get the job done in the right hands. Practice practice practice....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
TFO coming out with a 5 and 8 wt. outfit called NXT Black Label. They say these rods are used by fly fishing schools around the country. Comes with reel, line, and case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
I fish the floods quite a bit and they are often accompanied by a stiff breeze. I would suggest the 8 over the 6 because it’ll let you cast more confidently on those windy days. Also, the water on the flats can often be warm and stagnant and playing a fish with a 6 on a hot day is a good way to wear him out beyond repair.

As for a setup, the local fly shop here in Jax (Blackfly Outfitter) runs a deal on a nice combo every year during the “Flood Tide Festival.” You’ll usually get either a TFO or Reddington rod with a Reddinton reel that includes a Rio redfish line and backing, all for $250. It’s usually a really nice and well thought out combo that you’ll be able to grow into if you like it, or sell if you don’t. As a nice perk, they give you free casting lessons if you buy a rod from them so you’re killing two birds with one $250 stone.
 

·
I Love Skinny Water
Joined
·
6,108 Posts
@redfish5 listen to all above. Get a lesson first. That way you'll see if you like it our not. Try LL Bean, and ebay. Your going for Redfish dont get a bream rod
 

·
Brandon, FL
Joined
·
10,976 Posts
If you buy a cheap outfit and it turns out to be crappy to boot you will throw in the towel.

My advice is to read the many threads in the fly fishing section and that will give you a good indication of which setup is quality. Then look for a used one and you will be far better off.

Then of course there is the article called Yellowstone 8wt shootout - it tests a bunch of rods with experts giving their opinions. Some good, some not.

My suggestion is an 8wt and not a Cabela's.
 

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for all of the advice... I am in Fernandina, just north of Jax. I looked and Black Fly has a few beginner classes coming up. Has anyone been to one of these through Black Fly, or am I better off just hiring someone for 1 on 1 a couple times?
 

·
I Love microskiff.com!
Joined
·
3,513 Posts
I would participate in the Black Fly classes if I were you. That's a well known shop in the FL fly community and I would take advantage of it myself if I lived up there.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
352 Posts
Bvk 8wt paired with Rio summer redfish and reel of your choice.

This rod/line combo can shoot lasers with minimal false cast at 30-60” with your eyes closed. BVK’s can be had relatively cheap on the used market and the Rio line is under $100. This line is also available in a two tone which will help you visualize just how much line to carry outside your guides.

If you’re tight on cash and don’t want to overspend, I would start here. Plus, you can easily move this rod later if you don't like it or want to move up into something nicer and recoup most of not all of your investment.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top