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Discussion Starter #1
I will preface with this is my first post on the site, although I have visited here and there. I am a DIY'er who cannot help but get tangled up in projects and greatly underestimate the work involved, I am sure no one relates to that.....Anyway about 3 years ago I picked up a small skiff, an Avalon 146, with the greatest intentions, I believe I paid around $500 for it. Unfortunately I don't have pictures of the it as it was then anymore. I am from Louisiana, the north west coast side, and I ended up in the Vancouver and Portland area on a job after I started my "little" project and it was set aside in storage to languish. I returned to Louisiana just before the virus business started in earnest and decided I was going to buy a small bay boat, and then everything started shutting down.

The abridged version of this story is I decided I would just dust off the old girl and bring her back to life. I'm far enough along now that it may be interesting to people, like myself, who like seeing boat guts.

Originally it was covered with a few coats of terrible home job camo paint, and the interior layout was two bench seats with a centered post. It's an interesting little boat, as it is 100% composite. The benches were glassed over plastic honeycomb and the transom is cored with high density foam, there is no wood in it's construction. The pictures will start at the point where I had cut out the benches and sanded the topside past the gelcoat to glass. My intent was to achieve a "smooth" topside appearance, more like you'd have with a topcap than with a chopped mat layup. There were also 2 livewells that can only be seen in one picture. My vision was a single rear bench and a casting deck that provides storage, the rest of the interior being completely open.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Mainly it was primed just to reveal any areas that need attention, I am trying to achieve a "slick" topside. The structural material is a 1/2" coosa like fiber reinforced foam board branded "space age" that I purchased while in Portland. Epoxy was used for all layups, with 2 different types of 13oz cloth, one roven and the other being some sort of "draping" cloth used for surfboards, it went down much smoother and liked angles. A combination of PC11 2 part epoxy compound and thickened epoxy slurry has been used for plugging holes and fillets. I have been using bondo to smooth out the topside appearance. I am getting close to finishing and the weather has been horrible for the past week. The next major jobs before final coatings are carving an electrical chase through the flotation and reinforcing the transom.

It's also worth noting that the foam core is true closed cell foam, not spray foam. I was delighted to not find any water intrusion while removing fittings and hardware. The dimensions of this little boat is a centerline length of 14'6", the beam at the floor is 38" and 43" between the flotation chambers.
 
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