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Never been trout fishing will be in the Asheville area prepared to wear my duck hunting waders and try for some trout. Is it worth a damn when its that cold? If so what's a sufficient set up 4wt? Floating line or sinking? don't know anything about Trout fishing just looking for some suggestions.
 

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Old stomping grounds.
Love the place.
It's worth it if you like the cold.
Take both sinking and floating but depending on the creek/stream etc.
 

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Google Southern Appalachian Outfitters. They fish the North Toe and that area can be real good in the winter. But be sure and take felt sole waders your duck hunting waders will be ass busters unless they have spikes. There are numerous good outfitters in Ashville and Burnsville, North of Ash ville, and they can be a lot of help learning local fishing and tackle.
 

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My folks live just West of Asheville (near Cashiers), and I usually try to get a couple sessions in while I'm there for the holidays. I think the bigger waters (for example the Tukasegee river) hold better fish in the colder months. As others have said, its probably worth getting a guide.

As far as gear goes, if you happen to have a short rod, BRING IT, there's not much casting room in NC with the dense vegetation along the rivers.
 

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I live 2 hours from there in Charlotte and happy to meet up. 4 weight floating line would be perfect. I write for a blog and we posted a recent article about fly selection. Trout are cold water fish and fishing that time of year is great. There are tons of delayed harvest water and wild water near town. Happy to chat via phone if helpful or PM me for a few different rivers. My buddy Elijah guides out there too and he could take you out.

 

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if I can piggyback on the OP’s line...

We’re planning a camping trip up that way at the end of the month. Any good lines on camping site where a bubba can roll out of a sleeper bag and hit a creek?

Will be using a 5wt w floating line BTW. Also will the standard trout flies work that time of year? Have had a fly rod in had since 10 or 11 yrs old but always fished low country lakes (bass, bream) then moved on to salt water. Never wet a line for trout proper.
 

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if I can piggyback on the OP’s line...

We’re planning a camping trip up that way at the end of the month. Any good lines on camping site where a bubba can roll out of a sleeper bag and hit a creek?

Will be using a 5wt w floating line BTW. Also will the standard trout flies work that time of year? Have had a fly rod in had since 10 or 11 yrs old but always fished low country lakes (bass, bream) then moved on to salt water. Never wet a line for trout proper.
I'd camp around the Davidson River (mills, avery creek, etc.) or Curtis Creek. There are tons of opportunities around those two rivers. You could do Mount Mitchell or near the Pidgeon. Delayed harvest waters would be best if you want to catch fish, but some of the wild waters are really productive too. Attached below is a map. Happy to help.

Flies, I'd stick with a double nymph rig (one large and one small). Large - buggers (black, rust, olive, white), girdle bugs, stone flies, squirmy wormy. Small - hare's ear, zebra midge, duracell (purple/brown), rainbow warrior, anything natural size 16-22

 

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I lived on Tumbling Creek on the side of Bald Mountain for a few years. All of the small streams have native brookies. I was closer to Erwin and the Nolichucky River held nice size fish.
 

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My most productive day on the water was the weekend before Christmas on the Davidson River in the Pisgah. Between my friend and I we caught 5-6 dozen or so brown, bow, and brookies. It was cold, rainy, River blown out, and flowing fast. Wasn’t expecting much but she gave em up. Went back the following weekend. Same weather temp, rain, and flow. Skunked.
 

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Davidson River, my first trout fishing experience. Late 50's early 60's on vacation with my family and my trusty Shakespeare automatic fly rod. Go to local hardware store to buy dry flies I had been reading about for trout. Guy says son if your really want to catch some trout get you some whole kernel corn and some small hooks. Put a little split shot on and throw it in the pools. Man what a disappointment! Fortunately I met an older fella on the river that gave me some Royal Wulff and Female Adams flies, never looked back. Lesson, teach the next generation they will carry on the tradition.
 

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This was taken on the Davidson river. It’s funny here you could come up in December with 2 foot of snow on the ground or it could be 70 degrees, sometimes in the same week. Check in with Davidson river outfitters when you get here they can give you the best info on fly selection. You will need fine tippet 5 or 6x. Prepare to fish tiny flies 18s thru 22s.
 

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My most productive day on the water was the weekend before Christmas on the Davidson River in the Pisgah. Between my friend and I we caught 5-6 dozen or so brown, bow, and brookies. It was cold, rainy, River blown out, and flowing fast. Wasn’t expecting much but she gave em up. Went back the following weekend. Same weather temp, rain, and flow. Skunked.
First day of rain is amazing. Flushes the system with bugs and move the browns for sure
 

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As OP said, Davidson river can be great that time of year and many other area rivers nearby e.g., Mills River, Wilson’s Creek, etc. I can personally vouch for Davidson River Outfitters just outside Pisgah Forest in Brevard (used to live there) and fished with Landon from there, great guide and fly shop which will hook you up on private waters and provide rod, flies and more importantly, local knowledge. The Tuckasegee River is also great and heavily stocked and Fly Fishing Museum is there also. Pick up the book Western North Carolina Fly Guide by J.E.B. Hall a great resource to local rivers for those looking to go it alone. Light tippets, short 4-5 Weight rods and use of dropper fly rig highly recommended. If your right handed reeler like me DON’T, use left handed reel otherwise you’ll miss the bite as need to strip strike quickly. Best advice I can give and Best of luck on your fishing.
 

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Strike Indicator for Nymph Fishing

Since your new to trout fishing I'd suggest you look into how to use a strike indicator.
(fancy name for using a bobber for fly guys :) )

While I have never used one I have fished along side my dad who has and he demonstrated just how effective they can be by hooking up as much as 3 to 1 compared to me just using a single nymph.

youtube has "how to" videos
 

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Depends what you’re looking for, yes the fishing can be good, I’d go to the Davidson stopping at DRO. Like some others mentioned, you can sleep in to let the water warm a little.
 

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I'd camp around the Davidson River (mills, avery creek, etc.) or Curtis Creek. There are tons of opportunities around those two rivers. You could do Mount Mitchell or near the Pidgeon. Delayed harvest waters would be best if you want to catch fish, but some of the wild waters are really productive too. Attached below is a map. Happy to help.

Flies, I'd stick with a double nymph rig (one large and one small). Large - buggers (black, rust, olive, white), girdle bugs, stone flies, squirmy wormy. Small - hare's ear, zebra midge, duracell (purple/brown), rainbow warrior, anything natural size 16-22

Thanks VanM and others. Great gouge!
 
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