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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so far i know that to take a pic the iso should be at its lowest while the shutter speed set between 125-400 ( I hope).

How about the aperture? i know its for the depth. But is this something else i need to mess with or is there a good setting that i can just keep it on?
 

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What camera are you using Nikon or Canon?  Just curious as I am a Canon guy.  I would suggest a starting point as f5.6 for my grip and grin shots.  Also you don't have shoot digital at 100 iso like the old days of film, depending on the camera 400 iso works great and you won't have any noise issues.  If it is early or late in the day and your shutter speed is getting too slow just bump up the iso to 640 or 800 to get a decent shutter speed of 125-250.  Try using the AV mode until you get comfortable using Manual mode.
 

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Nikon D3000
There's nothing in between 400 and 800 iso.
And shooting in 800 on this camera is grain city. :(
What camera are you using Nikon or Canon?  Just curious as I am a Canon guy.  I would suggest a starting point as f5.6 for my grip and grin shots.  Also you don't have shoot digital at 100 iso like the old days of film, depending on the camera 400 iso works great and you won't have any noise issues.  If it is early or late in the day and your shutter speed is getting too slow just bump up the iso to 640 or 800 to get a decent shutter speed of 125-250.  Try using the AV mode until you get comfortable using Manual mode.
 

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Just went to dpreview.com and looked at some sample images from the D3000 it does look to introduce some noise between 400 and 800. You may be forced to shoot at 100 iso most of the time. Are you using .jpg or RAW capture? It might be better to try RAW and add some noise reduction in ACR during the conversion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
right now im shooting in jpeg till i kinda master this a little more. f5.6 is what i have been trying to keep it at so, atleast im doing that right...lol
 

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You might want to look at some of the Nikon forums as they may have some tips regarding your particular model of camera. Sometimes small settings changes affect your images. Good luck it is a fun hobby.
 

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f5.6 is a great place to start. The only reason I would go higher for fishing pictures is if I need to blur out the background to hide a fishing spot. Keeping it at ISO 100 will help you keep the details in your images. With entry level DSLR's 400 starts to get some noise that I have not been able to remove during conversion. 800 is unusable for me.

-Richard
 

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I agree with Richard on f-stop and iso. I am using a Canon 40D and at 400 iso there really is no difference in IQ. This is one of those camera specific things that can make a big difference in your images.
 

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If you want, check out www.photozo.com It is a great digital photography forum. The people over there are super helpful, and the members are from all over the world.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
f5.6 is a great place to start.  The only reason I would go higher for fishing pictures is if I need to blur out the background to hide a fishing spot.  Keeping it at ISO 100 will help you keep the details in your images.  With entry level DSLR's 400 starts to get some noise that I have not been able to remove during conversion.  800 is unusable for me.

-Richard
Ok, i think 5.6 is what ive been shooting with. The only problem im having now is: with the polarized filter, shooting at 100 gives me a pretty dark pic. is this normal with the filter or should i raise the iso when using it?
 

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The Pol. filter will make you lose apx. 2 stops of light effectively slowing your shutter speed. If your shooting in P, AV this will make no difference you will just have a slower shutter speed to create a correct exposure. The camera meters the exposure thru the lens so it compensates for the filter. The problem you may encounter is during low light not having enough shutter speed to get a sharp image. Then you have 2 choices bump the ISO or remove the filter. I would remove the filter and keep the ISO low. Might shoot some test images and post them with EXIF data so we can see what your doing.
 

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Forgot to add:  Are you using the histogram to check your exposures?  If not you might want to do a little reading on what to look for as it is a very useful tool in obtaining a correct exposure. 
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If you want, check out www.photozo.com It is a great digital photography forum. The people over there are super helpful, and the members are from all over the world.
Bro, great sight thx!
 
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