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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A lot of overnight camping/fishing trips require camping permits and lots of extra gear. I have always toyed with idea of just anchoring up in the backwater, throwing up a tarp, and sleeping on the boat. Obviously not the most comfortable but in theory it has its advantages. Has anyone had any experience with this? Any special setups for bugs/rain? I would love to hear some input before I head out overnight without a tent.
 

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I haven't camped on the skiff but I have camped off of a kayak before. Just me and one other person were able to load up enough gear on two 8 ft kayaks for a couple nights. This included a tent, air bed, cooler with food/drinks, fishing poles, tackle box, some clothes, utensils... oh and my 50 lbs pit bull came along too.

If I had to do it all over, definitely pick the time of year. I went in late May in south Florida in 10,000 Islands and would not do it again. Toted off by skeeters, torrential thunder storms, and hotter than hell. Being a native I should've known all this but said oh well. If I were to sleep in my boat I'd have a single air bed and some sort of fine mosquito mesh tent, and plenty of back up spray.

Oh and where I went there was no special permitting needed, I'm not sure where you are located but if its not a designated campground and just some random spit of land who's to care (or really know)?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Oh and where I went there was no special permitting needed, I'm not sure where you are located but if its not a designated campground and just some random spit of land who's to care (or really know)?
I had this in mind mainly for fishing Everglades National Park. Obviously very little available dry land sites (especially on the inside) and you are "supposed" to claim a permit for the campsites although we have found that to be abused. I just hate having to bring all the camping gear that just stays at camp/ loads down the boat. And having to bring extra fuel to run from the spots back to camp could be avoided. We cover a lot of ground in 2 or 3 nights but I feel like we could make even more out of it by not having to bring along camp/move it every other night. Plus I have always fantasized about anchoring up on a fishy flat from the day before and wake up surrounded by fish. All that being said, I know the everglades and I know mosquitos/storms are a huge concern no matter what time of year. We usually go around November or March.
 

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Look up Cape Romano. I know what you mean about not being able to find land that isn't tidal mangroves. Cape Romano is where I stayed, it is beautiful and it is the point where the bay meets the Gulf so it offers the most breeze (relief from bugs) and is definitely solid land. I saw nothing but fish heading out there, from large snook and reds up close by the mangroves to sand sharks beaching themselves and even a hungry bull patrolling right near camp. You are still in close proximity to the unlimited amount of mangrove trails out there as well.
 

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If I were to sleep on my boat, I think I would try to fashion a way to hang a hammock -- maybe something coming off of the poling platform, and something else coming up on the bow somehow? I'm not sure exactly how I would go about it, but I like the idea because I don't really have enough truly flat space for a tent, and it's fairly easy to use a mosquito net with a hammock.

Obviously it's a little more effort since you'd need to build supports for the hammock, and it could get a little unstable on a taller skiff, but it's food for thought. Hammocks also pack down much smaller than a tent.

Let us know if you go through with it! I'd love to get some ideas for doing something similar.
 

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I too am extremely interested in this topic. I have been thinking about some way to work out a hammock as that seems to be the most practical and comfortable. Would love to know if someone has come up with a way to do this. Sorry I couldn't contribute, but hopefully you get some ideas!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have definitely thought about the hammock. If you had a tiller or even a side console I wonder if you just strung from the poling platform to the front bow cleat if that would leave you hanging right in the cockpit. Definitely worth a try. My first thought was to tie a tight line from the bow cleat to the poling platform and string either a tarp or mosquito net or both from it to turn the cockpit into a make shift tent.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Now that's what i'm talking about! Wonder if you could steer that tiller from the hammock.....
 

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Looks like something Mark would come up with; very neat. How do you keep water out of the forward compartment when not in use?

As a kid I spent countless nights sleeping on my 13' Whaler by removing the forward thwart seat. There's something to be said about hull slap to lull you to sleep.
 

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Never done it in the HPX-T, but couple times in Shearwater 22z. Not an issue. Outside island an anchor up off bar far enough to cast to it. Spinning rod a must in dark. 40lb leader minimum. Good moon lit night you can see pretty good to move around alittle, slowly. Just be careful.
 

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Go with micro gear,only essentials. Pack it up and carry on.It sucks trying to enjoy fishing and worrying about the campsite. I love skiff camping but have learned you don't need 75% of what you think.
 

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I’ve done five (5) days in the Yellowstone backcountry multiple times...with a 40-lb backpack. So if you treat it as a backpacking trip....it’s doable. After breakfast each morning...pack away the gear in a backpack and start fishing. Of course you’re eating freeze-dried food and sleeping on a tiny air mattress.

I want to try this as well. I’d love to see photos of your final setup.
 
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I can’t imagine spending a night on the deck without a canopy. 99% of the time night dew is really heavy. Blue poly tarp?
 

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I'd bet that a poling platform and a front casting platform would hold up a hammock. Maybe a vertical rod holder mounted to the console or side, with a long net handle, could hold a tarp up.
 

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Slept for 3 nights on friends vantage. No rain gear. He slept across deck in front of motor. I slept in front with legs under casting platform. It was a great experience but takes paying attention to weather. Had a small yeti along with jumpseat cooler. Drinks were still cool in last day and we had plenty of food. We stowed everything but extra gas can during the day. It was a great experience. We have thought of doing it again, but never had sure enough weather.
 

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I have not done this but the thought has crossed my mind. I could easily sleep inside the gunnels on the deck of my Maverick and cover up with bug netting. I will do this at some point instead of hauling camping gear on my rig. No hammock needed for me.
 

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I've oftentimes thought about this. Going to need a really tight setup to make a hammock work - interested if anyone successfully achieves this. Maybe a stripper pole on the bow platform to get one end high enough. And then consider bringing a stripper with you. Two birds one stone...

The point related to morning dew raised by someone is real. I've thought that a line from the poling platform to the bow cleat then throw some sort of rainfly or tarp over it to create a makeshift tent might help.
 
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