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Discussion Starter #1
hoses from a Bobs cylinder after 13 years of service? I’m going to do some work and will be removing it. They look good and don’t seem to have corrosion seeping out of threads.
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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If the thing is full of hydraulic oil and they used Teflon tape to seal the threads, I don’t know how it could possibly seize. If you’re worried about it, make sure the wrench fits properly and whack it with a dead blow hammer to loosen. If it seems like it’s getting harder to turn as you back it out, stop because it is galling the threads. You’ll need heat at that point.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I don’t recall if I used Teflon tape when I installed it. If they give me any trouble I will just remove from pump instead.
 

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They make wrenches that are designed to work on fittings.
They are called line wrenches and you can pick up a set at harbor freight for cheap.
They look like a 6 point box end wrench with one flat removed.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yes I’ve seen those. My biggest concern was not ruining a working hydraulic cylinder because of a snapped fitting.
 

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One of the most efficient ways to remove stuck or corroded items seems very counter-productive.
This knowledge is from over 21 years as an aircraft specialist in the USAF.
Here it is.
If you believe the thing you are removing has a corrosive or mechanical lock, then before attempting removal or loosening, tighten it.
I don't mean lean on it and smoke it down
What I mean is to move it an almost imperceptible amount to break the bind that has formed.
By going inward first, you save stresses on the removal side of the fastener, the fitting or whatever else you are attempting.
Less chance of the bit climbing out or the flares stripping.
An example of this was a young man named Aaron who wanted to call a machinist to remove 32 stuck fasteners on an F-15.
I told him I would remove each one for a beer and he agreed. At the 24th he stopped me and asked if he could try again. I said sure, but if he didn't know how I was doing it he would be wasting his time.
Aaron described what he observed and pressed on, successfully removing the other screws.
He trained his co workers on his new skill and the incidents of stripped screws and use of a screw jack almost disappeared.

Use a back up wrench with your strong hand if possible. Hold it perfectly still and loosen the flare nut with your weak hand keeping in line with the fitting. Nothing should break or strip
 

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Zephyr Cove is on FIRE!
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One of the most efficient ways to remove stuck or corroded items seems very counter-productive.
This knowledge is from over 21 years as an aircraft specialist in the USAF.
Here it is.
If you believe the thing you are removing has a corrosive or mechanical lock, then before attempting removal or loosening, tighten it.
I don't mean lean on it and smoke it down
What I mean is to move it an almost imperceptible amount to break the bind that has formed.
By going inward first, you save stresses on the removal side of the fastener, the fitting or whatever else you are attempting.
Less chance of the bit climbing out or the flares stripping.
An example of this was a young man named Aaron who wanted to call a machinist to remove 32 stuck fasteners on an F-15.
I told him I would remove each one for a beer and he agreed. At the 24th he stopped me and asked if he could try again. I said sure, but if he didn't know how I was doing it he would be wasting his time.
Aaron described what he observed and pressed on, successfully removing the other screws.
He trained his co workers on his new skill and the incidents of stripped screws and use of a screw jack almost disappeared.

Use a back up wrench with your strong hand if possible. Hold it perfectly still and loosen the flare nut with your weak hand keeping in line with the fitting. Nothing should break or strip
Damn solid advice Mike
 
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