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I find myself teaching friends here and there how to fly cast and would love to offer more/better advice. I am considering taking the steps necessary to become a certified fly casting instructor (CI). I reviewed the examination materials and it seems attainable, with some practice of course. Has anyone gone through this process? Was it worth it it? Harder/easier than you thought it would be? This is more of something to complete for fun and my own satisfaction. Please share your experiences, thanks!
 

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I find myself teaching friends here and there how to fly cast and would love to offer more/better advice. I am considering taking the steps necessary to become a certified fly casting instructor (CI). I reviewed the examination materials and it seems attainable, with some practice of course. Has anyone gone through this process? Was it worth it it? Harder/easier than you thought it would be? This is more of something to complete for fun and my own satisfaction. Please share your experiences, thanks!
Don't know where you are located...

But, Captain David Edens is a certified instructor located on St Simons Island, GA. Fished with David over a decade ago. He knows his stuff! And, David is a good guy!
 

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I'm not a certified instructor but have a buddy that is. He says the exam is not a gimme and it includes a written and performance/teaching part.

The written section is fairly straight forward and can easily be passed but you do have to study.

The performance part can allegedly vary based on who is certifying you but is apparently not that hard. Included in the performance part though is a teaching part and you allegedly have to get a 100% on this to become certified.
 

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Yeah, I read through the testing procedure and requirements and that all seems to be correct still. I encourage the studying. It will only help me get better. Just looked though and the only testing dates in Florida for 2018 so far are during the week. I'm getting married next year so I am trying to save all of my PTO. Guess I will keep practicing and if another test opens up I think i'm definitely going to go for it.
 

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I got my FFF Certification back in 1992 by Lou Tabory and Lefty Kreh. The written test was easy and the practical exam (casting) can be pretty simple or a ball buster depending on who the instructor/tester is.

The tricky part of the casting test is having to produce casting mistakes & errors on demand and then discuss and execute the proper technique. There was no requirement to dump an entire line and then some. There was no 2-hand casting tests back then.

The test isn't cheap and you have to pay an annual fee to keep your certification. I let mine lapse after about 10-years and have not bothered to renew or re-test.

Is it worth it? If you want to offer casting lessons for a few $ it's a good thing to do. If you're just into helping friends or want the patch for your hat...probably not.

It does attract a certain king of guy that wants the bragging rights and yet, being certified doesn't guarantee you'll be a phenomenal caster.
 

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Is it worth it? If you want to offer casting lessons for a few $ it's a good thing to do. If you're just into helping friends or want the patch for your hat...probably not.
....the end game was to see if I could drum up a little interest in my area for paid lessons.
 

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....the end game was to see if I could drum up a little interest in my area for paid lessons.
I think for that reason it's a great idea. It will help those who are new to the sport feel comfortable that they picked a guy with good overall knowledge and abilities. Good Luck!
 

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I find myself teaching friends here and there how to fly cast and would love to offer more/better advice. I am considering taking the steps necessary to become a certified fly casting instructor (CI). I reviewed the examination materials and it seems attainable, with some practice of course. Has anyone gone through this process? Was it worth it it? Harder/easier than you thought it would be? This is more of something to complete for fun and my own satisfaction. Please share your experiences, thanks!
Pierson
I completed the CCI in 2013 and got my Master Casting Instructor Certificate in 2016.I am also an examiner and extremely familiar with the process. Passing is absolutely attainable but not without practice. It is not a gimme. Being a good caster and fisherman may not be enough to pass. The written test is not hard if you do your homework. Knowing the five essentials is a must. Not being able to list the five but to understand them and teach them. I have seen many people read the performance test , practice and show up for testing only to be disappointed. Many candidates can’t perform task one, 6-8 false casts. We can all make 8 false casts but to test expectations is different. Straight fly leg ,straight rod leg, Less than four foot separation between rod and fly leg ,gravity defying slowness, laser straight tracking , back cast loops same as forward cast loops and no deviation between the first and last false cast. After you perform any of the tasks you could be ask to teach them to the examiners. The FFI has information on each task and what is expected.
My suggestion is to seek an MCI mentor so you know how to prepare. I am mentoring 3 candidates one has been preparing four years and is ready to test. Give yourself plenty time. I am the event coordinator for testing in Lake Charles, LA July 12-13-2018. It has not been posted yet on the FFI website . If you need more information and think you would be interested in testing let me know.
Good luck on the CCI journey
JEFF MCI
 

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I'll probably ruffle some feathers, and on my first post here, but I'm going give an honest assessment, based on my experience with the CI process.

First, let me say that I would highly recommend finding an MCI (Master Casting Instructor) to mentor you. No matter how good a caster you are, they can teach you a lot. If possible, I'd recommend finding an MCI who has also completed the EDP (Examiner Development Pathway) process. Someone with the EDP background will be your best resource for being prepared for the exam. Can you pass the CI exam without a mentor? Yes, but it's tougher. Also, one caveat about mentors. If someone acts as your mentor, they are prohibited from being an Examiner for your exam. I mention this for anyone who might have a limited number of MCIs in their area.

Second, don't be in a hurry to take the CI exam. Take your time, and when you're sure that you can perform each and every task perfectly, which is where that MCI-EDP mentor will be an asset, then schedule your exam. You have 1 year, from the time that you officially begin the process, to pass the exam. Otherwise, you have to start over. I made the mistake of starting my CI process, by attending the workshop, and thinking that I would be ready within the year. I wasn't, but I had to take the exam anyway, and I failed. The exam is expensive, so don't waste your money by taking it before you're ready.

Third, get teaching experience. The focus of the exam is to see how good you are at teaching. I know someone, who is a very good caster, but failed the CI exam, because of his teaching skills. For example, I have been helping my mentor give casting clinics. While we're teaching casting, he's also observing my teaching, and gives me feedback/advice. He's also a resource if I have trouble conveying a concept.

Having said all of that, I've put the CI Exam on the back burner, until I see how things progress with the EDP. I think that the EDP is good, in theory, because it's supposed to ensure consistency in how the exam is administered. However, FFI might have misjudged some things, when they implemented the EDP. The EDP requires a significant commitment, in terms of time and money, and many MCIs have opted not to pursue it, which means that they will not be able to give examinations. As a result, there might be few, if any, MCIs in your region who can administer the CI exam. For example, there were zero CI examination opportunities, here in the Mid-Atlantic in 2017. In the past, candidates would have been able to take the exam at the Fly Fishing Show (Somerset, NJ), or the Fly Fishing Show (Lancaster, PA), or the Virginia Wine and Fly Fishing Festival (Richmond, VA). If I'd tried to take the CI exam in 2017, my best bet would have been to drive 8 hrs (round trip) to New York. I wrote a letter to FFI HQ about the problem, and participated in a call with HQ as part of the FFI Chesapeake Council, earlier this year. My impression, which was shared by other Council members, was that HQ didn't think there was a problem.

Only you can say whether the FFI's CI certification is worth while for you, but I hope the above helps. If you have any specific questions, I'd be happy to try to answer them.

Tight lines,

Dave
 

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I'm a life member of FFI, a terrible caster and fly tier but I really like the organization. Wish we were getting more young blood in the Houston area.
 
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