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Lowcountry Degen
2021 Conchfish 17.8
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1,821 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There are several people on this board who seem to have thrown lots of different rods, so I figured someone might have some experience with the TFO Clouser Rod. I picked one up in a 7wt, and have had a little trouble with my cast. I think that maybe my flies are too heavy, or my line might not be matched quite right, or (most likely) my casting technique needs work.

I'm using the 7wt Clouser rod with 7wt SA Mastery Textured Grand Slam line. There is a small sweet spot where the rod seems to load well, but if I have slightly too much or too little line out, I can't make a nice cast. I feel like the line just kind of dies on the back cast and never really loads the rod up -- I can sit there waiting all day for it to load, but the line will fall to the water before it ever does.

Anyway, I can work on my casting fundamentals, but I was wondering if anyone had thrown this rod and noticed any errors that this rod was more sensitive to.

Thanks!

Bryson
 

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Fly Fishing Shaman
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6,387 Posts
Is it the shorter 8'9" rod or their 9ft rod? What is the reel on the rod? What is the other closest rod you are use to casting and is your go-to rod (i.e.8wt, 6wt....etc)? How long of flyline out of the tip top sweet spot are you talking about (not the leader)?

I teach with basically the same rod in a 9ft without the TiCrx coating. The coating is designed for impact resistance resistance, which keeps lead eyes (clousers) from completely damaging the rod at that point of impact. It also slightly stiffens the rod.
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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227 Posts
Is it the shorter 8'9" rod or their 9ft rod? What is the reel on the rod? What is the other closest rod you are use to casting and is your go-to rod (i.e.8wt, 6wt....etc)? How long of flyline out of the tip top sweet spot are you talking about (not the leader)?

I teach with basically the same rod in a 9ft without the TiCrx coating. The coating is designed for impact resistance resistance, which keeps lead eyes (clousers) from completely damaging the rod at that point of impact. It also slightly stiffens the rod.
I asked on this board about casting weighted flys. It would be a good read to help you. From what I gather, opening your loop helps casting weighted fly and the oval cast is what one guide showed me. I need to practice throwing weighted flys as I had a miserable time this Feb in Hopedale. La. I think the opening of the loop makes the presentation a little softer for weighted flys. 2 cents from a novice.
Joe

http://www.microskiff.com/threads/fly-rod-for-weighted-flys.38683/#post-307674
 
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Fly Fishing Shaman
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6,387 Posts
I asked on this board about casting weighted flys. It would be a good read to help you. From what I gather, opening your loop helps casting weighted fly and the oval cast is what one guide showed me. I need to practice throwing weighted flys as I had a miserable time this Feb in Hopedale. La. I think the opening of the loop makes the presentation a little softer for weighted flys. 2 cents from a novice.
Joe

http://www.microskiff.com/threads/fly-rod-for-weighted-flys.38683/#post-307674

Again, most fly fishermen don't realize that the fly size and weight needs to be purchased or designed and tied around the rod you are planning to throw it. You can't just break out 4" long flies with medium dumbbell size lead eyes designed for big bull reds in Hopedale and expect to throw them on a 6wt, open loops or not. Both the rod and the flylines are not designed for that. Matching the flies for the rod size and line weights are critical for casting. Otherwise, you might as well pitch them out there on a cane pole or spinning rod.

Remember, you are casting the flyline and Not the fly. The fly is just along for the ride. Sure there are ways and methods to throw slightly larger flies than normal on a particular flyline and therefore flyrod,(i.e. opening up your loops, Belgium cast, etc.). But sizing the flies to the flylines use is important to proper casting. You will find that stepping up to a larger fly rod like a 9wt or 10wt will help throw those over size heavier flies. That is one of the main purposes of going up rod weights, aside from fighting ability and wind conditions.

Bottom line, match the fly size and weight to the flyline used.

Ted Haas
 

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Lowcountry Degen
2021 Conchfish 17.8
Joined
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1,821 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is the 9 foot model, and I'm using a Lamson Guru HD reel on it. It's been a while since I've thrown the 7wt since it seems to be pretty windy on the days that the flood timed match my availability to fish, but I feel like the sweet spot is maybe with around 25'-30' of fly line out of the rod? I will try to throw it some in the lawn and get a better idea.

I'm still pretty new to fly fishing, but my go-to rod has been a 10wt TFO Signature Series 2 with some Rio Redfish Floating line. I think I might be having a tough time dialing down the power to a 7wt. I remember having similar issues lawn casting a 5wt once, when the back cast just seemed to never stretch out -- it felt like it just kind of piled up in the air, if that makes any sense.

The only things I've thrown with this rod so far are crabby/shrimpy patterns with extra small or small lead eyes, plus a few gurglers in a very sheltered canal in the Keys (although I didn't have as much of a problem with those). I recently threw a kung fu crab with medium dumbbell eyes, but was struggling with that fly. I haven't been throwing many unweighted flies, but I have tied some up that I think I should use more often.

All that being said, what do you look for in a cast to determine whether or not your fly is too heavy for the rod and line? Maybe I'll save the 7wt for lighter flies on low wind days, and use the 10wt to cast anything with dumbbell eyes?

Thank you guys for offering up your advice -- hopefully I'll get some experience under my belt and be able to contribute to the fly forum as well. I'm going to study that other thread and see if I can open my loops up a little. I struggle with a tailing loop sometimes, even with my 10 wt -- mostly it seems to come from hauling a little early, but I'm sure there are some underlying issues as well.
 

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Fly Fishing Shaman
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6,387 Posts
Yea that Kung Fu crab is definitely too heavy for a 7wt and that size weigh is better suited for a 9wt or better, like your 10wt.

A 10wt takes more effort to throw. If you then pick up that 7wt and apply the same force on the rod, you could very well be over powering the rod. I don't know cause I can't see what you are doing. But if you really slow down and take it easy and allow the rod to do all the work, then you will find that it translates into smoother energy applied, which is what that rod needs.

Where do you live? Can you have someone take a video with your cell phone, from your casting side, showing you pick up the line off the lawn, false cast it as you would normally do a few times showing your rod, arm and hand movements and then pan back to your back cast and out towards your front cast and showing you shoot the line a few times. I'm thinking 4 or 5 cast and 2 to 3 minutes of video. Then you can email me the video clip or a link to the video clip and I can then see what is happening and advise you on what to do. If you are game for that, then PM me and I'll forward my email address.

Ted Haas
 

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Lowcountry Degen
2021 Conchfish 17.8
Joined
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1,821 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
@Backwater thanks for offering to do that! I'll get a video either tonight or tomorrow and send it your way. It would be really helpful to get your opinion!
 
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