And you wonder why your taxes are so high...

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by TomFL, Dec 10, 2010.

  1. TomFL

    TomFL Well-Known Member

    From a current Yahoo News headline:

    Accomplished professionals often don't consider the federal government as a prospective employer. But they should--half of federal hires in the past several months have been at starting salaries over $100,000, says Seattle career coach Robin Ryan. And by some estimates, the government needs to hire more than 270,000 people by late 2012 just to keep "mission-critical" functions up and going.

    (DO THE MATH ON THAT BOYS, THAT'S ANOTHER $27,000,000,000 they need to raise annually just to make those additions in payroll alone!! If every man, woman and child in America worked (and you know that isn't a realistic statement) that's almost an EXTRA $100 out of everyone's pocket!)

    With masses of civil-servant baby boomers headed toward retirement, and with the creation of new federal agencies and programs responding to national-security and economic-downturn issues, our federal government is eager to find qualified hires.

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    Here's a look at some of the well-paid jobs for which the federal government has thousands of openings.

    (Salary figures for these jobs are provided by online salary database PayScale.com. Projected hiring figures are from Where the Jobs Are, a nonprofit, nonpartisan website that promotes government-service jobs.)

    Program manager ($75,497)
    Government agencies assign projects via contracts--and then people have to manage those contracts to make sure they stay on budget. The Department of Homeland Security--one of the agencies hiring the most right now--needs 1,850 program managers. Once you're in as a program manager, you can easily go from project to project within various government agencies for the rest of your career, says Heather Krasna, the author of "Jobs That Matter: Find a Stable, Fulfilling Career in Public Service."

    Logistics manager ($62,782)
    The Departments of the Army and Navy need about 2,000 of these experts to help them move goods and personnel efficiently and cost-effectively, both at home and overseas. Prior military experience is a strong plus here, says Janet Ruck, a coauthor of "Guide to America's Federal Jobs."

    Attorney ($80,009)
    The Department of Justice alone needs 2,700 attorneys, out of more than 5,500 projected attorney hires across all agencies. Qualified attorneys can pick their area of interest--for example, transportation, treasury, environment, or communications.

    Paralegal ($45,761)
    The Department of Justice also has a big need for paralegals and anticipates hiring 870 by 2012. Also known as legal assistants, paralegals help lawyers prepare cases and may draft contracts, take depositions, or write briefs. Many get started with a certificate program or by earning a two-year college degree.

    Intelligence analyst ($60,158)
    In a world of homegrown terrorists and threats that seem to come from nowhere, intelligence analysts are in demand. Analysts research and study data to come up with policy recommendations, says Ruck.

    Physician ($112,464)
    The Department of Veterans Affairs alone needs a staggering 8,500 more doctors, as it gears up to meet the needs of returning military members.

    Pharmacist ($103,839)
    The Department of Veterans Affairs is seeking more than 2,300 pharmacists to dispense medications for returning veterans. Pharmacists must earn a specialized Pharm.D. four-year degree from an accredited college or school of pharmacy, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports.

    Auditor ($104,762)
    The current administration's focus on accountability and transparency means programs must be closely monitored to make sure funds are properly spent--and that means auditors are in demand. The Department of Defense alone wants 1,700 more.

    Information technology manager ($72,980)
    Nearly every federal agency wants more tech help--in all, more than 11,000 IT managers and specialists are being sought. Homeland Security, the Treasury, and the Army and Navy all have big needs.

    Civil engineer ($63,059) or electrical engineer ($69,187)
    More than 10,000 engineers are being sought by federal agencies, including NASA and the military. Electrical engineers are needed to design equipment including machine controls, electric motors, and transmission devices for the electric grid, while civil engineers are in demand to design and supervise projects as America rebuilds crumbling infrastructure such as roads, tunnels, and bridges.

    Learn more about federal job opportunities at the United States Office of Personnel Management website.
     
  2. drewrossi

    drewrossi Well-Known Member

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    Good news for me since I will be graduating with my Civil degree in about a year!
     

  3. DuckNut

    DuckNut Brandon, FL

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    Snooky, that is awesome.

    Get a Govt. job and after 10 years they will forgive your student loans as well. Thank you Mr. Obama.
     
  4. flightmedicjh41

    flightmedicjh41 I Love microskiff.com!

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    Interesting, of the jobs you posted only two had a salary over 100,000. As a federal employee myself, I can count on one hand the amount of people I work with that make over 100k. Not saying your wrong and not trying to argue with you, just saying that I would be willing to bet that the majority of those that are getting hired in 2012 are not over 100k, but I have been wrong before. In either case the federal government has on its payroll almost every job that exist in the civilian market and in most cases anyone can apply at usajobs.opm.gov. Good Luck
     
  5. flightmedicjh41

    flightmedicjh41 I Love microskiff.com!

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    Correction three had a salary over 100k. Sorry
     
  6. JRH

    JRH Well-Known Member

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    Is there a law against gov't employees making over $100K? Should the gov't set a maximum salary for all employees?

    News flash - if you want competent, educated, qualified people to handle important jobs, you have to pay them well.

    Otherwise, you're left dealing with a lazy, overweight, uneducated, obnoxious employees. For example, the people making $30,000 a year working behind the counter at the DMV. And we all know how the average experience at the DMV goes.

    You get what you pay for.
     
  7. JRH

    JRH Well-Known Member

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    Oh, and your math sucks.

     
  8. TomFL

    TomFL Well-Known Member

    Obviously my point was missed by some. At least now we know who works for the government... :)

    And we also know who can't do math.. :)

    Those $30k a year DMV workers ain't looking so bad!!
     
  9. phishphood

    phishphood Beer is good, Beer is good, and stuff!

    Who do I give my $100 to get one of those $100k jobs?
     
  10. The_Skiff_Shop

    The_Skiff_Shop Well-Known Member

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    Me!!!!!! [smiley=luck.gif]

    999 to go.[smiley=1-biggrin.gif]
     
  11. DuckNut

    DuckNut Brandon, FL

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    The government is not in practice of hiring competency, never have been and never will be, they are in the practice of hiring bodies to fill a seat.  Quality and efficiency is not high on the priority list.

    There are so many successful companies that have been started out of the incompetency of the government and now shows just how incompetent the government agencies actually are.

    There are so few people that work for the government that are actually motivated to exceed in life.  It does not matter what agency you pick on (DMV, Post Office, etc.) because the people who work there are typically not motivated individuals and there personalities make them afraid to take a chance and that is why they are where they are.

       Let me guess...you work for the illustrious tax collectors office.
     
  12. flightmedicjh41

    flightmedicjh41 I Love microskiff.com!

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    I guess you are correct! I have put my entire life on hold so that I may hold down a government job. I have volunteered to go to Iraq twice (not as a contractor making 150,000 a year) but as a member of the National Guard. That is three daughters birthdays, two Christmases, the loss of a loved one, and dreams that will more then likley haunt me for the rest of my life. I have such a lack of desire to suceed that I could have many times taken a cushy contractor job and set myself up so that I did not have to work, or chose not to go. Instead I chose to go to school so that I may get a degree and go to work for a smaller government agency making less money with less security serving a city in the fire service. The point is that there are people in this world that are only out for themselves. There is nothing wrong with this it is what makes America great, but somewhere, someone has to stand up and do the work that others are not willing or unable to do. There are people that obtain government jobs and sit there, but if you throw out a blanket statment that the majority of us make over 100k and that we get our jobs and sit there because we cannot, or do not desire, to go elsewere, you are mistaken. My job sat open for three years before I took it so obviously there was noone that wanted it or noone that was qualified for it. In either case I was looking for a job and took one that I thought I could support my family with while gaining the experience that I thought would be useful after leaving. If that makes you upset or means that I have a lack of desire to move forward then so be it.
     
  13. TomFL

    TomFL Well-Known Member

    I think you missed my point entirely and might want to read the OP again.

    Enlisted service is not a government job per se. Thanks for your service to our great country though.

    -T
     
  14. JRH

    JRH Well-Known Member

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    TomFl,

    Let's start over. Please articulate what point it is you're trying to make.

    Also, you've made an ass out of u and me by assuming I work for the gov't. I don't. I'm not a liberal/democrat, and I didn't vote for Obama, so you can leave those assumptions out as well.

    Lastly, I'll give you the benefit of the doubt on your "$27,000,000,000" figure. Please explain how you arrived at that number.
     
  15. JRH

    JRH Well-Known Member

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    Look I can do assumptions too:

    Let me guess...you don't have a college degree and earn less than $100,000/year.
     
  16. TomFL

    TomFL Well-Known Member

    Here's my point:

    BIG GOVERNMENT= BAD

    Clear now?

    -T
     
  17. JRH

    JRH Well-Known Member

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    Crystal.

    Here's 19 billion in wasted tax money I'd like to see cut from the federal budget:

    "A bipartisan NASA authorization bill signed by President Obama last month allocated $19 billion for NASA next year – a modest boost from NASA's 2010 budget of $18.3 billion. But funds for that bill have not yet gone through the appropriations process by Congress."
     
  18. JRH

    JRH Well-Known Member

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    A 310 million dollar waste of money:

    "The Obama administration announced yet another funding proposal for Everglades restoraton on Friday, a sign of on-going support despite growing concerns in Washington over deficit spending. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar urged Congress to approve an additional 5.5 miles of bridging across the Tamiami Trail to restore water flow into Everglades National Park. Work already has begun on a one-mile bridge. “If ultimately authorized and funded by Congress, this proposal will benefit the environment and economy of South Florida,” Salazar said. The estimated cost for additional bridging — including construction, design work and land purchase — is $310 million. Increased flows across the trail and improved water distribution are considered essential to the health of the park and to the survival of wildlife, including the endangered wood stork, Everglades snail kite and Cape Sable seaside sparrow. "
     
  19. aaronshore

    aaronshore Well-Known Member

    Come on Jason.......no amount is too much to save the Everglades Snail Kite.
     
  20. levip

    levip I Love microskiff.com!

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    that is the ONE case where the government should just step in put their foot down and take the land - i lived in stuart fl most of my life and every year they dump thousands of millions of gallons of polluted fresh water from the lake right into the st.lucie river and it flows right out onto the flast at sailfish point and i dont know about you guys that fish there regularly but that flat doesnt have NEAR the seagrass it did just a few short years ago
    save the 310 million to build the bridge besides its probably a sugar company that owns it anyway
     
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