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I Love microskiff.com!
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I seem tons of aluminum trailers on skiff and boats but 80 percent or more of them are using galvanized hardware to attach to the aluminum support beams that run perpendicular to the bunks.

Anyone have an aluminum trailer that they actually used aluminum for the bunk support? Why don’t we see more like this? My trailers rear bunk mounts are starting to get rusty and I have thought of taking to aluminum fab shop and having them weld in aluminum square/rectangle tube to replace these galvanized mounts.

Is it due to the aluminum being weaker/stiffer and more prone to cracking when the skiff is being loaded onto the trailer?
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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I have aluminum supports. The only galvanized metal is the torsion axle. This is on a Continental trailer
 

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I think the last part you wrote is why not many aluminum trailers are fully welded. They need a little give. They should be using stainless hardware as it has less issues than galvanized. @Tigweld on this site builds the sexiest aluminum trailers I've seen and he'll probably give you a better explanation.
 

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And @Tigweld uses I beams with carpeted plastic board as the bunks instead of wood. He can correct me if I'm wrong. The wood holds in all that water and moisture that starts galvanic issues.
 

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Lowcountry Degen
2021 Conchfish 17.8
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Aluminum gets significantly weaker when welded. I'd still use aluminum bunk brackets and cross members though, but I'd bolt it all together with stainless hardware, and use antiseize and corrosion blocking spray.

I would also avoid using the trailer as a ground. Run the ground wire all the way up the tongue and have a lug there. That way the trailer is still grounded, but it doesn't have to carry the ground in lieu of a wire.
 

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SeaArk 1860 MVT
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Price is the reason, it’s cheaper to pay someone to just bolt a trailer together rather than pay a skilled welder to actually fabricate the pieces and weld it all together. All cheap trailers are bolt together. Look at MYCO or AlumaTrail trailers with 30 to 40 ft boats on them. Those trailers are completely welded and are beyond strong if done correctly.
 
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