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I Love microskiff.com!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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Here’s one of several new designs coming out that will be available in full size patterned plans or CNC cut out parts. My design can be built by anywelding shop or at home. Get the aluminum parts cut out and assemble on your own.
If building in core follow my build method and you can have this hull built in 40-50 hours time. Total skiff weight if built to my specs can be from 385 lbs up to just over 400 lbs using low tech inexpensive materials. These hulls can be built using exotics if wanted but not needed.
In plywood it will weigh more, about the same as aluminum.
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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Any idea for the aluminum version's weight? Say 3/16" bottom n 1/8" sides n decks?
Dang, just had a 18x60 flat built, could be a replacement boat...also what is max/min horsepower range.
Yeah Chris has started banging out these designs and plans since right after I started my build last year! Was thinking the CF 17.5 looked ideal next but this is aluminum would be a sweet ride for oyster country. Seen the Sabine skiffs but out of my budget.
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
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Is anyone building this skiff yet? @Chris Morejohn
To answer, no one has built one yet. The plans will be Available in a month. My partner Nathan who does all the CAD work for CNC machining from my drawings is on vacation now. He lives in Michigan so it’s go time to enjoy some sun.
We will be providing plans that will be extreamly accurate for plasma cutting or CNC routing out.
When making paper patterns with printers it gets a bit complicated as you have to watch the patterns as they are printed to make sure they don’t creep, so all the plans will have the measurements for hand laying out if building in core or plywood.
Using my build system in core or ply it will take around 40 hours to build a complete hull.
I will have hull sizes available up to 21’.
I have been around since Dave Exley built the Banana river skiff. He chopped the bottom off a Mitchel skiff to arrive at the Banana river flat bottom skiff. Next he added Vee to this and called it the Super Skiff. Scott Deal liked it and redesigned it to come out with the Maverick Marage. HBBWs came out with the Whipray and Scott then came out with the HPX. Hal then used the HPX as his guide to redo and came out with the Islamorada 18. Inbeteen Mavericks overhanging plastic spray rail Harry Spears version and Explorboatworks overhanging sheers came along Sabine skiffs sheer. The fun thing for me is I have measured all the above skiffs so I know how much displacement they are dealing with, I also know how tippy they are so I have worked to correct as best I can with my version of what essentially is a flat planked conical 1 chine skiff.
Sooooo what makes MY VERSION different is I am incorporating a variable deadrise bottom with the lower chine angle varying as it goes forward. This means I don’t want to drag along the deep vee of the Super Skiffs, Chittums 18 stern. I want the vee to be at its best spot for going into chop. I will add in my reverse spray strake to help stay a bit drier when in beam seas.
Next depending on what material you use the upper chine can be very simple and effective or a little bit more detailed. If building using my core system these hulls can be built in eglass and be as light or lighter as an all carbon Chittum skiff if wanted. Because you will be building a one off you will have lots of lower chine and lifting strake options to use if wanted.
Last thing because it’s all home building I can advise for any hull variations.
Lots of these panel hull designs to come out this winter.
Check out the 15’ skiff above. Can weigh 160 lbs in core and use an 8 hp. Lots going on soon as I finish my sail to BC.
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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Looks like it would work in aluminum plate, but wouldn't u still have to fabricate the station forms n fasten with ? To forms. I'm guessing screws to wood frames. Ur thoughts?
 

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Brandon, FL
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There is a jig used but it is much simpler.

Once the panels are cut they fit together and the hull will take shape..
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Looks like it would work in aluminum plate, but wouldn't u still have to fabricate the station forms n fasten with ? To forms. I'm guessing screws to wood frames. Ur thoughts?
In all 3 mediums, you would need a simple strong back to build off of. That is a long table like set up. In aluminum it would be nice to have it in metal so you could just temporarily spot weld the transoms plate to and the 2 main bulkheads. In the others it’s just a 2x6 jig like a big ladder at an easy working height to suit.
So.... in aluminum all the panels will have been plasma cut or on your own. The plans will have marks to show how each panel has to line up as they are welded out or stitched together. Kinda like gluing or stitching a banana skin back onto a peeled banana. You just start at one end and work forward.
In core and ply it’s about the same thing except you have to glass the Chines together and then the outside of the hull.
When building in aluminum you just weld the Chines up and your hull is mostly done.
You flip over and install the interior pieces by welding in place and your skiff comes together.
This type of hull shape lends itself to a very quick build in what ever medium chosen.
What I am designing is hull shapes that are more evolved than a simple flat bottom or old school tin skiffs 1 chine vee bottom.
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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In all 3 mediums, you would need a simple strong back to build off of. That is a long table like set up. In aluminum it would be nice to have it in metal so you could just temporarily spot weld the transoms plate to and the 2 main bulkheads. In the others it’s just a 2x6 jig like a big ladder at an easy working height to suit.
So.... in aluminum all the panels will have been plasma cut or on your own. The plans will have marks to show how each panel has to line up as they are welded out or stitched together. Kinda like gluing or stitching a banana skin back onto a peeled banana. You just start at one end and work forward.
In core and ply it’s about the same thing except you have to glass the Chines together and then the outside of the hull.
When building in aluminum you just weld the Chines up and your hull is mostly done.
You flip over and install the interior pieces by welding in place and your skiff comes together.
This type of hull shape lends itself to a very quick build in what ever medium chosen.
What I am designing is hull shapes that are more evolved than a simple flat bottom or old school tin skiffs 1 chine vee bottom.
So with transom, n 2 other bulkheads in position tack weld segments to frames n together?
 

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I Love microskiff.com!
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So with transom, n 2 other bulkheads in position tack weld segments to frames n together?
Basically that’s it. You start at the stern or in the middle and work your way along the chine seams going forward and aft. It helps if your bulkheads are secured in one place so they don’t lay over.
If wanting to build say 5-10 hulls then I would build a good jig and you could then just lay your panels over and assemble?
 
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