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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Currently in the process of adjusting my quiver. At the moment, I only have a 9wt and looking to get a 7wt rod as another rod in the arsenal. At the moment, having trouble deciding if this is the path I actually want to take. So, I want to hear it from y'all. Should I keep the trend that I'm going for now, or fully adjust to a 6wt and 8wt setup? I know the 8wt is the bread and butter rod weight in Florida, where I'm fishing, and a lot of people love the 6wt as a good, light backup rod weight. Open to all suggestions. Thanks!
 

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To be honest, it just depends on the rods you have and what you line them with. Numbers don’t mean a whole lot these days. A fast 6wt that needs a 7.5wt line for your liking is not really a 6wt. So my question would be what is your current gear not providing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
To be honest, it just depends on the rods you have and what you line them with. Numbers don’t mean a whole lot these days. A fast 6wt that needs a 7.5wt line for your liking is not really a 6wt. So my question would be what is your current gear not providing?
I guess the issue I'm having currently, being limited to just one rod, and it being a 9wt, is that it just feels too heavy for a good deal of applications I use it for. Fish in pretty clear conditions a lot and the 9wt just feels like it can spooks fish too much with how big the line is in the clear water. Also, not providing enough finesse in some more close quarters situations, like back in the mangroves. Doesn't quite feel like the generalist rod weight that I was initially getting it for when I first started fly fishing a couple years back, and as I get better with casting, it just feels like too much rod. Hence why I'm considering stepping down to an 8 weight for bigger fish and a 6 weight for smaller fish or when I need a little more finesse and fine placing of flies for the spooky, clear water fish.
 

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What 9wt rod/line are you working with? It could be as simple as a line change to give you what you’re after.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Currently working with a Lamson SS paired with Airflo Gulf Redfish. Looking at it, the 9wt Gulf Redfish has the same grain weight as a 10wt. Could be as simple as that.
 

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I just switched to Airflo Gulf Redfish on my Lamson SS 8 wt and can tell the difference in size of the line and presentation from the SA Grand Slam I switched from. I'll be adjusting lines based on where and how I am fishing in a given day. That may be a simple solution to your problem.

Or you can have fun and build a 7 wt outfit for other situations.
 

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is that it just feels too heavy for a good deal of applications I use it for.

the 9wt just feels like it can spooks fish too much with how big the line is in the clear water.

Also, not providing enough finesse in some more close quarters situations
If you go with an 8, cast it first to be sure it's not as "heavy" as your 9.
Depending on what I'm after (trout/reds/snook) I use a 7 unless the wind starts to blow to much for the 7 or the size of the fish are 10+ pounds. You can land a pretty good size fish on a 9 but over 40 pounds you generally have to exhaust them just to get to the leader. I used my 6 wt for a short time until I hooked up a jack.
I use a very fast action 5 for bones, again going up as needed for the wind.

As fer finesse, it's not the rod but the cast.
I can cast my 12 (50 feet or so) so that the line stops while still in the air and the fly/leader drops into the water.
If I through it 70 feet I'm using a lot of force so I usually place the fly where I think the fish is going to be 8 to 10 feet in there path, still doesn't "slam into the water" but were not talking floating like butterfly..
Pretty hard to finesse a shot under the mango's if your side arming it with any rod.
I'd mention my 8 but I haven't seen it since my older daughter took a liking to it :)
 

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I mean, many solutions have been given above. Bottom line is are you trying to spend money or nah? The reality of it is how often your throwing a fly rod.
 

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I have Sage 10, 8, 6, and 5 weight rods - all made for salt water. Mostly chase redfish in Texas. I use the 5 weight 95% of the time in all wind conditions and keep coming back to it. Have some fun with a light weight rod!
 

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I roll with a 6, 8, and 11. I have found that anything I can do with a 7....I can do with a 6 wt. I like to go with a lighter set up especially in the winter when I'm dropping down to 8# tippets for reds in TB. The I find my 8 wt. ends up being reserved for dock light fishing for snook and poons.....juvenile poons in the river.....or throwing topwater flies around the mangroves during the warmer months. If I could throw my 6 for everything I would. During the warmer months the 6 does beach snook duty, open flats sight fishing, and anything else in between. The 11 is for the big poons. When you find a line/rod combo that makes life easier....that's what you roll with, regardless of what weight they are. Mine is the Lamson SS rods and Monic Henley Phantom Tip lines.
 
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As some folks have mentioned above you will likely not notice much difference between a 6-7wt or a 8-9wt. When I first started fly fishing I was always told to stick to either even or odd numbers. 2,4,6,8 or 3,5,7,9 etc. however... now that I started building my own rods... that theory has gone out the window lol. Best thing IMO would be test cast to see if you can find exactly the action you’re looking for.
 

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The answer is just really specific to the fishing one does. Now that said, my thoughts are as follows.

1. I actually prefer a 7 and 9 over a 6 and 8. I can adjust to a lighter application by using a longer leader and smaller flies. And I can throw a larger fly with a 9 a bit easier than an 8.
2. You already have a 9 so its cheaper to add a 7 than to sell the 9 and buy a 6 and an 8.
3. The answer down the road is probably a 6, 7, 9, and 11 so get the 7 and you are half way home!
 

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A lot of modern rods are 3/4 to a full size heavier than they are marked. Whatever true to standard weight line casts well on the rod is the true line weight of the given rod. If you’re throwing a line that actually measures a 10, you’re fishing a 10. That Redfish line also probably has a lot of its weight up front for throwing weighted flies. That just makes it less delicate and heavier feeling because it is.

I’d try a 9 wt bonefish type line on your current rod and see if that helped with a more gentle delivery. If that helps, great. Then I’d look at a 7 wt rod as a complement to the 9. If you like the 9, look at the same rod model in a 7. It might be nice to have similar feel in both outfits.
 

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Given that I have nowhere near the experience as most of the guys here, I find that there is more difference in feel between a 5 and 6 weight as opposed to a 8 and 9 weight. The argument to stay odd weight or even weight is valid, to me, over 7wt. Over 7wt staying all odd or all even makes more sense. Below a 7wt there is more difference in weights, get as many as you can afford.
If you have a 9wt, drop to a 7wt, then add an 11 later for stud fish. A 7wt is not too big to throw streamers and such for freshwater trout, is heavy enough for most bass fishing, and will handle most inshore salt. Still, an 8wt is a standard go-to.
In the end, try before you buy! Get thee to ye olde fly shop, and cast thy line.
 

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Keep the 9 and buy a 6.good gap between the two for nice calm conditions and with smallish flies and one rod for throwing meat at large fish or battling the wind.
 

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Seems like adding a 7wt to your 9 wt is a legitimate path. As a point of reference, I have Helios 3D rods in 7, 8 and 9 weights. I have found the Rio Bonefish Quick Shooter to be the best line for me in saltwater on the 8wt and 9wt. I use Rio Gold on my 7wt with a very light weight Lamson reel due to the type of fishing (more freshwater and smaller flies).

IMO - My 7 wt is a "more fun" version of the 8 wt. The 9 wt seems to be a different tool for different applications . . . . more wind, bigger flies, etc. My 9 feels heavier, but it's probably due more to the bigger reel and heavier line.

I totally agree that throwing the various options before you buy is the way to go.

Best of luck!!!
 
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