35mm All Year

Discussion in 'Photo Hut' started by perrymcfly, Mar 15, 2017.

  1. perrymcfly

    perrymcfly Active Member

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    So last year I shot A LOT with my Canon 8-15mm fisheye, had my fun, learned a lot and it works great for a "fishing" lens. I decided to put that one down and focus on a different lens this year. Sticking with the Sigma 35mm F1.4 for the new boat glass. Trying to force myself to learn something new. Any tips and tricks for a prime lens for some killer shots?
     
    rjackh90 likes this.
  2. Danny Moody

    Danny Moody Well-Known Member

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    The 35 F/1.4 is one the finest focal length / aperture combinations. My advise to really understand DOF (Depth of Field). To get a good understanding use the link below to a DOF calculator. There is an app also.

    http://dofmaster.com/dofjs.html

    I am not sure what camera body you shoot but explore pulling exposures. You can make some magical things happen when pulling exposures on shallow DOF shots. Do this by slowing your exposure on a desired aperture. (shoot in aperture priority). This will overexposure the image giving you greater ability to pull more rich light from the file.

    Lastly, if you are not already, shoot RAW and use a photo editing software like Adobe Lightroom.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2017 at 9:49 AM

  3. YnR

    YnR I Love microskiff.com!

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    Got any examples? I was told to do the opposite of what you suggest to pull colors out with Photoshop/Lightroom. Once the image is overexposed, those colors are gone but if you underexpose or meter for the highlights, then you can still pull those colors with help from some editing software. Maybe, I'm misunderstanding what you're saying.

    I've got no experience shooting in RAW but my understanding is, it isn't worth doing unless you're willing to do some post processing on each shot that you do shoot in RAW(hence the JPEG + RAW option).

    Always want to learn some new techniques, so eager to hear you out.
     
  4. Danny Moody

    Danny Moody Well-Known Member

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    jpg Color is measured digitally from 0 - 256, basically total black to total white. One something goes all black or all white, there is no way to regain it. Raw is measured from 0 - 16,000ish (depending on the camera). It is much easier to pull over and underexposure back from a raw image.

    In the days of film, It was always recommended to push exposure (meaning underexpose). People did this as it was easier to pull light from the darkness with darkroom burning techniques. Overexposing with film was frowned upon because there was no way to pull darkness back from light.

    Digital photographers who shoot raw lean towards overexposing as its much easier to pull darkness out of an image digitally.

    Read this and give raw a try.

    https://photographyconcentrate.com/10-reasons-why-you-should-be-shooting-raw/
     
    jmrodandgun likes this.
  5. YnR

    YnR I Love microskiff.com!

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    Hmm, may have to rethink how I've been doing things. Granted, I do very little editing these days
     
  6. perrymcfly

    perrymcfly Active Member

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    I've just recently started to dive into post processing and editing through lightroom and photoshop so I've changed to shooting in RAW. I'm shooting with a Canon 70d, so even though its a crop frame body the 35mm still seems to have a nice field of view on the skiff. Thanks for the tips, I'll be back on the water shortly and I'll share some images!