14FT Fiberglass Boat - In over my head!

Discussion in 'Bragging Spot' started by Philip, Jan 6, 2018.

  1. Philip

    Philip Active Member

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    Whatsup guys. I'm new here and I just purchased my first boat, which from the looks will be a little bit more of a project for me. I found this forum looking for ideas on what to do on this boat. For the most part I have no idea what I am doing, I've never done any fiberglass work or anything on boats. So I am looking for advice and guidance along the way.

    To start off this is what I bought. It's a 1972 14 FT Johnsen fiberglass hull.
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    My intentions for this boat are to redo the screaming lime green paint that the previous jackass put on it. Remove the rotting deck and attempt to create my own decking following a couple designs I've seen on here and google. With that being said I started the process of taking off all the hardware from the top side.

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    With the help of my little buddy I got the boat flipped and ready to start stripping the paint.
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    I purchased this stuff called aqua strip from the local West Marine... I'm not entirely sure it was necessary considering I could have just sanded the old paint down. But like I said this will be my first project and I may do things that make no sense. I tested the stuff out on the front corner to see how fast it would work. Then after 12 hours I scraped it off with a plastic scraper. Then reapplied a coat over the whole boat. I am really hoping this stuff will work.
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    I am not sure if I should try to pressure wash it rather than a scraper but I will attempt it tomorrow hopefully to see if pressure washer will be easier. Depending on attention I will try to be up to date on what I am doing. Hopefully I can entertain a few.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2018
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  2. Ryan Anderson

    Ryan Anderson Active Member

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    What motor are you putting on it?
     

  3. Philip

    Philip Active Member

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    Im still not sure. I was leaning towards a 20hp mercury.

    The transom is 15 inches from the top to the bottom. So I think with that being said I need a short shaft motor with whatever I get. I started seeing alot of people putting a metal extension plate for the outboard. Do I need to get one of those?
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2018
  4. yobata

    yobata I Love microskiff.com!

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    Sweet Johnsen! Mine is close to the same vintage! Welcome to the forum, and good luck with your rebuild. Feel free to ask any questions along the way, there are some knowledgeable and helpful folks here.

    P.S. I put a 25hp 2 stroke Yamaha (short shaft) on mine and she loves that motor, but the 2 stroke 25hp Mercury is also a great option!
     
  5. Philip

    Philip Active Member

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    B19F7D56-6125-46DE-ACCE-72C55A63FBD7.jpeg




    B73836AF-9DB9-489E-A6EB-80CE9F1E6A1E.jpeg
    Most of the paint came off pretty easy with a scraper except I’m guessing that red paint was antifouling or something because it was a pain in the ass.
    Come to find out the name on the boat prior to the green was “PRINCESS”. Adorable.
    Also I came across a bunch of cracks in the gelcoat I’m assuming. I’m not quite sure what I should do about that. I think I’m gonna apply some more aqua strip to take off the rest of the red and some green left behind in the gunnels.
     
  6. Philip

    Philip Active Member

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    6B3C3170-BCAC-4B04-9F2F-617AB37B77E9.jpeg
    So I need advice, how should I fill these small divots? Is it bad there are a lot. Also that crack appears to only be in the gel coat.
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    I came across this while I moved it back in the garage. I do not think this is a good thing.... water keeps heading out slowly from this crack. What should I do? Back to google I guess. I am going to buy some west system epoxy 105 and 106. I read online that you can make a thickened batch of epoxy and use it to fill.
     
  7. Tonyskiff

    Tonyskiff Active Member

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    Hey mate I had same thing on my hull. Looked like someone riding on concrete. What you need to do is get a dremel tool with engraving attachment go over every hairline crack and scratch. Then get a gel coat putty and fill them in. Then just sand them down. Before you fill wipe all with solvent. Also dont mix large quantities of putty it kicks off pretty fast. Good luck post some pics.
     
  8. yobata

    yobata I Love microskiff.com!

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    There are 3 "strakes" (I'll call them that but they're not sharp like other strakes) on these Johnsens. On mine (1967), the middle one (keel) can be seen from the inside of the hull, but the two on each side were not. I am assuming those two on the side were added later? Anyway, if the middle one is leaking water, there isn't really a good source for that. The only place would be if water was somewhere in between the gelcoat and the woven roving / chop mat that these hulls were made from. I agree with tony, grind it out and fill with layers of 12 or 17 oz biax fabric and grind back to smooth. Thickened epoxy is just neat epoxy thickened with cabosil, milled fiberglass fibers, wood flour, etc.

    Btw at some point you're going to have to put a sander/grinder on that hull. I wouldn't waste too much more time on chemical strippers, especially if you're going to be adding fiberglass to the inside which will require you to sand down to the original fiberglass anyway... good luck! Lots of good reads on rebuilding a hull on this site.
     
  9. Philip

    Philip Active Member

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    Started sanding with my makeshift attachment lol. More of a pain than I thought but it’s getting somewhere. 8BAFE608-2A28-4E1F-A662-0431197C556F.jpeg 39C8CB9F-AE12-495B-A0C1-3DE31B91A804.jpeg
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    Last edited: Jan 7, 2018
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  10. Philip

    Philip Active Member

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    I could see why the water would be in between gel coat and the fiberglass, the previous owner had the boat beaches in his backyard with rear half in water and front on the lawn. I’m gonna let it dry out for a couple of days while I’m working on the sanding.

    So your saying I need to grind out the divets and hairline cracks? Seems intimidating. I’ll look into it. Thanks for the feedback and advice.
     
  11. yobata

    yobata I Love microskiff.com!

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    I was referring to the section that is draining water. Most of those other cracks look like they are in the gelcoat and are not in the actual fiberglass below it, but I could be wrong. Sand a few down with your orbital sander and check it out, if they all look the same and the few you sand all the way down aren't cracks in the glass you're probly ok??
     
  12. Philip

    Philip Active Member

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    7A390B8F-6E76-4B7F-A0B0-6EE2EE3C3033.jpeg
    I used the dremel and cut a hole into that strake. It was like niagra falls for 15 mins. Filled a gallon into that bucket.


    Seems like a lot of the divets have condensation building around them after I sanded them. My question is should I sand out the whole area where these little chips in the gel coat are? Or just bondo them?
    7842DE66-FFFA-435F-8274-97A439AC28D2.jpeg
     
  13. Mike C

    Mike C Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like standing it against the house bow up, and bottom of hull facing south in full sunlight for a week is what you need.
    That should dry it out.
     
  14. WhiteDog70810

    WhiteDog70810 Mostly Harmless

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    That entire strake is rotten. Grind it off and replace it. Rot doesn’t unrot if you cover it up with more glass. If you think something ugly is hiding, cut a a big window and take a look. Epoxy/FG is easy to work with, so don’t be scared to hack and slash. Remember two things. 1.) A chance to cut is a chance to cure. 2.) God hates a coward.

    Nate
     
  15. Philip

    Philip Active Member

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    I am pretty close to being done with sanding. I’m gonna get the supplies in the mail this week for filling holes and fairing compound. Hopefully fix all the holes and cracks.

    How do you know if your transom is trash? I’m only putting A 20-25 hp on it do I need top notch transom? Do I need to get a jack plate? Any particular place or way to get a new motor cheap?
     
  16. yobata

    yobata I Love microskiff.com!

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    I checked Craigslist for 3 months before I bought a reliable 2 stroke Yamaha 2006 25hp (short shaft -15"). Just check every day while working on your skiff and you will find something worth while. The transom height should be standard (although motor height standards are not necessarily standardized so much anymore). The most common heights are either 15" or 20", with 20" having the most options in the new variety....
     
  17. Tonyskiff

    Tonyskiff Active Member

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    Do you know if you have wood transom? My transom felt rock solid but when I opened it up it was full of rutted wet plywood. I would try to do few drill holes just to see the content see if it’s wet. You can always patch it up with epoxy potty with fiberglass. Also do the sound test see if it deffers from one place to another. As for the jack plate check out “Vance manufacturing” they have bunch of different inexpensive options. I got a 4” set back plate very good quality.

    Post more pics.
     
  18. Cut Runner

    Cut Runner Active Member

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    The last picture on post 12 shows osmotic blistering from where the previous owner left the boat sit halfway in the water on the bank. At the very least your going to have to sand all the gelcoat off in that area then fill. If you just try and fill the cracks they will show thru the paint.
     
  19. predacious

    predacious Well-Known Member

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    bondo ??

    first thing would've been to check the transom core - it's a simple process.

    small ball peen hammer,tap the transom on the outside - pay attention to areas where there's openings - like that drain tube.good sound is a sharp distinct sound - bad sound is a dull thud.dull thud means delamination,which means you're recoring a transom ...

    take care of that situation before going any further.


    those blisters - that's because gel coat and other polyester based products are porous - read that as not waterproof."bondo" - one of the main ingredients of that waste of money is "talc" - talc absorbs water...not good huh ?? water passes through that gel coat and It's trapped - causing damage to the glass - forming a blister,or,the gel pops in small spots leaving raw glass.the area around a blister needs to be opened,dried,and repaired as needed - filling with an epoxy is the best method.

    if you've water running out of that strake - it needs to be dried completely,before attempting to repair anything...

    chemical stripping is never a good idea - recall that whole "porous" thing ?

    then you're left with dealing with the chemicals along with heavy metals...not a good thing


    what are you planning on replacing the deck with - core material ? what's your "finish" going to be ? gel coat ? paint ? be aware of the fact single part paints,contrary to popular belief,never fully harden - even if using "hardener".a 2 part paint will fully harden - however,it's much more involved,and costly...

    if you're planning on using wood coring,that means epoxy - epoxy and gel coat won't play well together,without a separation coat of a vinylester product.polyester products won't provide the bond,when used with wood,as the epoxy will.composites are always the best choice,but certain steps are required for proper use - lots of people are unaware of those steps.cost - composites,with the exception of nidacor,will cost more than wood.and last,there's a big difference in wood - pressure treated "cdx" ply is about the worst thing you could ever use - NOTHING will adhere to it.it may appear to adhere,however looks are deceiving...

    depends on what you're wanting,as far as a finished product - you want a sharp,sweetly "done up" rig,or a "utilitarian" finish ?


    lots of options....